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The Causality Between Economic Growth and Immigration in Germany and Switzerland

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  • MANUEL GONZÁLEZ-GÓMEZ

    (University of Vigo, Spain)

  • Mª SOLEDAD OTERO GIRÁLDEZ

    (University of Vigo, Spain)

Abstract

This paper analyses the relationship between immigration and the economic growth in Germany and Switzerland during the period 1970-2005 by using a cointegration approach. Both countries have gone through a similar learning process. First they encouraged low-skilled and temporary workers. More recently, they have attracted high-skilled people and restricted the recruitment of low-skilled immigrants. Our empirical analysis reveals important differences between Germany and Switzerland. The results may be useful for other countries that attract immigrants to compensate for shortages in the labour market and in response to the ageing of the population.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economic and Social Studies in its journal Economic and Social Review.

Volume (Year): 42 (2011)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 271–287

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Handle: RePEc:eso:journl:v:42:y:2011:i:3:p:271-287

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  1. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  2. Brian Fanning, 2010. "From Developmental Ireland to Migration Nation: Immigration and Shifting Rules ofBelonging in the Republic of Ireland," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 41(3), pages 395-412.
  3. Mackinnon, J.G. & Haug, A.A. & Michelis, L., 1996. "Numerical Distribution Functions of Likelihood Ratio Tests for Cointegration," G.R.E.Q.A.M. 96a09, Universite Aix-Marseille III.
  4. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
  5. Johansen, Soren & Juselius, Katarina, 1990. "Maximum Likelihood Estimation and Inference on Cointegration--With Applications to the Demand for Money," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 52(2), pages 169-210, May.
  6. Tano, Doki K., 1993. "The added worker effect : A causality test," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 111-117.
  7. Morley, Bruce, 2006. "Causality between economic growth and immigration: An ARDL bounds testing approach," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 90(1), pages 72-76, January.
  8. Granger, C W J, 1969. "Investigating Causal Relations by Econometric Models and Cross-Spectral Methods," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 37(3), pages 424-38, July.
  9. MacKinnon, James G, 1996. "Numerical Distribution Functions for Unit Root and Cointegration Tests," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(6), pages 601-18, Nov.-Dec..
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