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An examination of processes linking perceived neighborhood disorder and obesity

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  • Burdette, Amy M.
  • Hill, Terrence D.
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    Abstract

    In this paper, we use data collected from a statewide probability sample of Texas, USA adults to test whether perceptions of neighborhood disorder are associated with increased risk of obesity. Building on prior research, we also test whether the association between neighborhood disorder and obesity is mediated by psychological, physiological, and behavioral mechanisms. We propose and test a theoretical model which suggests that psychological distress is a lynchpin mechanism that links neighborhood disorder with obesity risk through chronic activation of the physiological stress response, poor self-rated overall diet quality, and irregular exercise. The results of our analyses are generally consistent with this theoretical model. We find that neighborhood disorder is associated with increased risk of obesity, and this association is entirely mediated by psychological distress. We also observe that the positive association between psychological distress and obesity is fully mediated by physiological distress and poor self-rated overall diet quality and only partially mediated by irregular exercise.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

    Volume (Year): 67 (2008)
    Issue (Month): 1 (July)
    Pages: 38-46

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:67:y:2008:i:1:p:38-46

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    Keywords: Health inequalities Neighborhoods Body mass Distress Psychological distress USA;

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    Cited by:
    1. Rehm, Colin D. & Moudon, Anne V. & Hurvitz, Philip M. & Drewnowski, Adam, 2012. "Residential property values are associated with obesity among women in King County, WA, USA," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 491-495.
    2. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace, 2014. "Weight perceptions, weight control and income: An analysis using British data," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 12(C), pages 132-139.
    3. Johnston, D.W.; & Lordan, G.;, 2012. "My body is fat and my wallet is thin: The link between weight perceptions, weight control and income," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 12/27, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    4. von Hippel, Paul T. & Lynch, Jamie L., 2014. "Why are educated adults slim—Causation or selection?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 105(C), pages 131-139.

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