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Self-rated health within the Canadian immigrant population: risk and the healthy immigrant effect

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  • Bruce Newbold, K.

Abstract

Set within the determinants of health framework and drawing upon Statistics Canada's longitudinal National Population Health Survey, this paper explores the self-assessed health of Canada's immigrant population. Using both descriptive and multivariate techniques, including logistic regression and survival analysis, the intent is to identify differences in self-assessed health between the immigrant and native-born populations, the factors that contribute to immigrant self-assessed health, and the factors associated with declining self-assessed health status. In each case, the key questions are whether differences in health status exist between the native- and foreign-born. Results indicate mixed support for the Healthy Immigrant Effect, with the native- and foreign-born neither more nor less likely to rank their health as fair or poor. However, results from the proportional hazards model indicated that the native-born were at lower risk to transition to poor health.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Social Science & Medicine.

Volume (Year): 60 (2005)
Issue (Month): 6 (March)
Pages: 1359-1370

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Handle: RePEc:eee:socmed:v:60:y:2005:i:6:p:1359-1370

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Related research

Keywords: Canada Immigrant health Self-assessed health;

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Cited by:
  1. Rebekka Christopoulou & Dean R. Lillard, 2013. "Is Smoking Behavior Culturally Determined? Evidence from British Immigrants," NBER Working Papers 19036, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. James Ted McDonald, 2005. "The Health Behaviors of Immigrants and Native-born People in Canada," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 144, McMaster University.
  3. Hamilton, Tod G. & Hummer, Robert A., 2011. "Immigration and the health of U.S. black adults: Does country of origin matter?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 73(10), pages 1551-1560.
  4. Anita Davies & Carolyn Blake & Poonam Dhavan, 2011. "Social determinants and risk factors for non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Asian migrant populations in Europe," Asia Europe Journal, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 461-473, April.
  5. Hongyun Fu & Mark VanLandingham, 2012. "Mental Health Consequences of International Migration for Vietnamese Americans and the Mediating Effects of Physical Health and Social Networks: Results From a Natural Experiment Approach," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 393-424, May.
  6. Monika Sander, 2007. "Return Migration and the "Healthy Immigrant Effect"," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 60, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  7. Wang, Lu & Hu, Wei, 2013. "Immigrant health, place effect and regional disparities in Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 8-17.
  8. Moen, Phyllis & Fan, Wen & Kelly, Erin L., 2013. "Team-level flexibility, work–home spillover, and health behavior," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 69-79.
  9. Teitler, Julien O. & Hutto, Nathan & Reichman, Nancy E., 2012. "Birthweight of children of immigrants by maternal duration of residence in the United States," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(3), pages 459-468.
  10. Halliday, Timothy J. & Kimmitt, Michael C., 2008. "Selective Migration and Health," IZA Discussion Papers 3458, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Lisa M. Bates & Julien O. Teitler, 2008. "Immigration and low birthweight in the US: The role of time and timing," Working Papers 1085, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

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