Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

What suicides reveal about gender bias

Contents:

Author Info

  • Mitra, Siddhartha
  • Shroff, Sangeeta

Abstract

This article uses some general findings in the medical literature on suicide to suggest how male and female suicide rates in a society can be used to measure the "unfreedom" of women relative to that of men. Our definition of "unfreedom" is similar to that of Amartya Sen and consists of all kinds of suppression of mental or physical freedoms such as physical or sexual abuse, poverty, lack of economic opportunities, and so on, as well as an absence of liberty to voice complaints about the denial of the mentioned elementary freedoms. Though suicides are often associated with mental disease partially attributable to genetic factors, a mental illness is neither necessary nor sufficient for suicide. Rather a suicide is often the result of a multiple coincidence of mental disorders and repression of elementary freedoms. Given that the male and female cohorts in a society have the same genetic background, a major change in the male female ratio of suicide rates can conceivably occur only through a change in the relative incidence of unfreedoms. An application of this inference is attempted for Indian states.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5H-4PYP71Y-6/2/9e29de7b41f4cf1f36869d62d7c97fc9
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics).

Volume (Year): 37 (2008)
Issue (Month): 5 (October)
Pages: 1713-1723

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:5:p:1713-1723

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/620175

Related research

Keywords: Suicide rate Empowerment Relative wellbeing Status;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. John F. Helliwell, 2004. "Well-Being and Social Capital: Does Suicide Pose a Puzzle?," NBER Working Papers 10896, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Deirdre N. McCloskey & Stephen T. Ziliak, 1996. "The Standard Error of Regressions," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 34(1), pages 97-114, March.
  3. McCloskey, Donald N, 1985. "The Loss Function Has Been Mislaid: The Rhetoric of Significance Tests," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 201-05, May.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Manoj K. Pandey & Charanjit Kaur, 2009. "Investigating Suicidal Trend and its Economic Determinants: Evidence from India," ASARC Working Papers 2009-08, The Australian National University, Australia South Asia Research Centre.
  2. Pandey, Manoj K. & Kaur, Charanjit, 2009. "Investigating suicidal trend and its economic determinants: evidence from India," MPRA Paper 15732, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:5:p:1713-1723. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.