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The effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility

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Author Info

  • Hamersma, Sarah
  • Kim, Matthew

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the effect of parental Medicaid expansions on job mobility. If expanded Medicaid eligibility makes it easier for a person to have health coverage between jobs, we expect it to reduce "job lock" that occurs for workers with employer-provided health insurance. Expanded eligibility could also decrease mobility among those in jobs without health insurance, since they experience less pressure to move to an insured job ("job push"). We find strong evidence that expanded eligibility reduces job lock among unmarried women but not men or married women, and only weak evidence of reduced job push among men.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Health Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (2009)
Issue (Month): 4 (July)
Pages: 761-770

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Handle: RePEc:eee:jhecon:v:28:y:2009:i:4:p:761-770

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/inca/505560

Related research

Keywords: Health insurance Job lock Job mobility Medicaid;

References

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  1. Donna B. Gilleskie & Byron F. Lutz, 2002. "The Impact of Employer-Provided Health Insurance on Dynamic Employment Transitions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(1), pages 129-162.
  2. Madrian, Brigitte C, 1994. "Employment-Based Health Insurance and Job Mobility: Is There Evidence of Job-Lock?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(1), pages 27-54, February.
  3. Jonathan Gruber & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1993. "Health Insurance Availability and the Retirement Decision," NBER Working Papers 4469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Kanika Kapur, 1998. "The Impact of health on job mobility: A measure of job lock," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 51(2), pages 282-298, January.
  5. Jonathan Gruber, 2001. "Taxes and Health Insurance," NBER Working Papers 8657, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Jonathan Gruber & Brigitte C. Madrian, 1994. "Health insurance and job mobility: The effects of public policy on job-lock," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(1), pages 86-102, October.
  7. Busch, Susan H. & Duchovny, Noelia, 2005. "Family coverage expansions: Impact on insurance coverage and health care utilization of parents," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(5), pages 876-890, September.
  8. Anna Sanz-de-Galdeano, 2006. "Job-lock and public policy: Clinton's second mandate," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 59(3), pages 430-437, April.
  9. Anna Aizer & Jeffrey Grogger, 2003. "Parental Medicaid Expansions and Health Insurance Coverage," NBER Working Papers 9907, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Mark C. Berger & Dan A. Black & Frank A. Scott, 2004. "Is There Job Lock? Evidence from the Pre-HIPAA Era," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 953-976, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Fairlie, Robert W. & Kapur, Kanika & Gates, Susan, 2013. "Job Lock: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," IZA Discussion Papers 7785, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Lucie Schmidt & Lara Shore-Sheppard & Tara Watson, 2013. "The Effect of Safety Net Programs on Food Insecurity," NBER Working Papers 19558, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hamersma, Sarah & Kim, Matthew, 2013. "Participation and crowd out: Assessing the effects of parental Medicaid expansions," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 160-171.

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