Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Paying the piper and calling the tune?: A meta-regression analysis of the double-dividend hypothesis

Contents:

Author Info

  • Anger, Niels
  • Böhringer, Christoph
  • Löschel, Andreas

Abstract

We present a meta-regression analysis of model-based simulation studies assessing the employment effects of environmental tax reforms. Besides the role of central modeling assumptions we investigate the implications of contracting bodies on the simulation results. Our analysis reveals the importance of unobservable study characteristics for the prospects of a double dividend in terms of lower emissions along with higher employment levels. While at first glance labor market assumptions and the contracting body seem to play a central role for the model outcome, these observable features are no longer significant when unobservable study features are controlled for. In contrast, we find the simulated employment impacts of environmental tax reforms to be determined by a joint set of explicit model assumptions as well as implicit characteristics of the respective studies.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6VDY-4YJRN90-1/2/ba577aa65ef0914c60ff69622b198b9d
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 69 (2010)
Issue (Month): 7 (May)
Pages: 1495-1502

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:7:p:1495-1502

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

Related research

Keywords: Environmental tax reform Employment Meta-analysis Regression;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Patuelli, Roberto & Nijkamp, Peter & Pels, Eric, 2005. "Environmental tax reform and the double dividend: A meta-analytical performance assessment," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 564-583, December.
  2. Heinz Welsch, 1996. "Recycling of carbon/energy taxes and the labor market," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 8(2), pages 141-155, September.
  3. Jon Nelson & Peter Kennedy, 2009. "The Use (and Abuse) of Meta-Analysis in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics: An Assessment," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 42(3), pages 345-377, March.
  4. Stefan Bach, 1997. "Steuerreform in Deutschland," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 66(3-4), pages 291-316.
  5. Lawrence Goulder, 1995. "Environmental taxation and the double dividend: A reader's guide," International Tax and Public Finance, Springer, vol. 2(2), pages 157-183, August.
  6. Carraro, Carlo & Galeotti, Marzio & Gallo, Massimo, 1996. "Environmental taxation and unemployment: Some evidence on the 'double dividend hypothesis' in Europe," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1-2), pages 141-181, October.
  7. Bosquet, Benoit, 2000. "Environmental tax reform: does it work? A survey of the empirical evidence," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 19-32, July.
  8. Pearce, David W, 1991. "The Role of Carbon Taxes in Adjusting to Global Warming," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 101(407), pages 938-48, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. repec:eid:wpaper:04/10 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Abdullah, Sabah & Morley, Bruce, 2014. "Environmental taxes and economic growth: Evidence from panel causality tests," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 27-33.
  3. Andrea Kollmann & Friedrich Schneider, 2010. "Why does Environmental Policy in Representative Democracies Tend to be Inadequate? A Preliminary Public Choice Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 3223, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Zhou, Su & Kutan, Ali M., 2011. "Is the evidence for PPP reliable? A sustainability examination of the stationarity of real exchange rates," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(9), pages 2479-2490, September.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:69:y:2010:i:7:p:1495-1502. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.