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Economic valuation of the vulnerability of world agriculture confronted with pollinator decline

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  • Gallai, Nicola
  • Salles, Jean-Michel
  • Settele, Josef
  • Vaissière, Bernard E.

Abstract

There is mounting evidence of pollinator decline all over the world and consequences in many agricultural areas could be significant. We assessed these consequences by measuring 1) the contribution of insect pollination to the world agricultural output economic value, and 2) the vulnerability of world agriculture in the face of pollinator decline. We used a bioeconomic approach, which integrated the production dependence ratio on pollinators, for the 100 crops used directly for human food worldwide as listed by FAO. The total economic value of pollination worldwide amounted to €153 billion, which represented 9.5% of the value of the world agricultural production used for human food in 2005. In terms of welfare, the consumer surplus loss was estimated between €190 and €310 billion based upon average price elasticities of − 1.5 to − 0.8, respectively. Vegetables and fruits were the leading crop categories in value of insect pollination with about €50 billion each, followed by edible oil crops, stimulants, nuts and spices. The production value of a ton of the crop categories that do not depend on insect pollination averaged €151 while that of those that are pollinator-dependent averaged €761. The vulnerability ratio was calculated for each crop category at the regional and world scales as the ratio between the economic value of pollination and the current total crop value. This ratio varied considerably among crop categories and there was a positive correlation between the rate of vulnerability to pollinators decline of a crop category and its value per production unit. Looking at the capacity to nourish the world population after pollinator loss, the production of 3 crop categories – namely fruits, vegetables, and stimulants - will clearly be below the current consumption level at the world scale and even more so for certain regions like Europe. Yet, although our valuation clearly demonstrates the economic importa

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 68 (2009)
Issue (Month): 3 (January)
Pages: 810-821

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:68:y:2009:i:3:p:810-821

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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Keywords: Pollination Valuation Vulnerability Agriculture Ecosystem service Crop;

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  1. Dagmar Schröter & Colin Polsky & Anthony Patt, 2005. "Assessing vulnerabilities to the effects of global change: an eight step approach," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 573-595, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Kontogianni, Areti & Luck, Gary W. & Skourtos, Michalis, 2010. "Valuing ecosystem services on the basis of service-providing units: A potential approach to address the 'endpoint problem' and improve stated preference methods," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(7), pages 1479-1487, May.
  2. Fabrice Flipo & François Deltour & Cédric Gossart & Michelle Dobré & Marion Michot & Laurent Berthet, 2009. "Technologies numériques et crise environnementale : peut-on croire aux TIC vertes ?," Working Papers hal-00957836, HAL.
  3. Vesa Kanniainen & Tuula Lehtonen & Ilkka Mellin, 2013. "Honeybee Economics - Implications for Ecology Policy," CESifo Working Paper Series 4204, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. repec:idb:brikps:64718 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Grazia Zulian & Joachim Maes & Maria Luisa Paracchini, 2013. "Linking Land Cover Data and Crop Yields for Mapping and Assessment of Pollination Services in Europe," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 2(3), pages 472-492, September.
  6. Nuppenau, Ernst-August, 2011. "Linking Crop Rotation and Fertility Management by a Transition Matrix: Spatial and Dynamic Aspects in Programming of Ecosystem Service," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114600, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  7. Fleischer, Aliza & Shafir, Sharoni & Mandelik, Yael, 2013. "A proactive approach for assessing alternative management programs for an invasive alien pollinator species," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(C), pages 126-132.
  8. Barfield, Ashley & Bergstrom, John C. & Ferreira, Susana, 2012. "An Economic Valuation of Pollination Services in Georgia," 2012 Annual Meeting, February 4-7, 2012, Birmingham, Alabama 119780, Southern Agricultural Economics Association.
  9. May, Peter H. & Soares-Filho, Britaldo Silveira & Strand, Jon, 2013. "How much is the Amazon worth ? the state of knowledge concerning the value of preserving amazon rainforests," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6668, The World Bank.
  10. Kuldna, Piret & Peterson, Kaja & Poltimäe, Helen & Luig, Jaan, 2009. "An application of DPSIR framework to identify issues of pollinator loss," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 32-42, November.
  11. Bauer, Dana M. & Johnston, Robert J., 2013. "Foreword: The Economics of Rural and Agricultural Ecosystem Services: Purism versus Practicality," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 42(1), April.
  12. Smith, Helen F. & Sullivan, Caroline A., 2014. "Ecosystem services within agricultural landscapes—Farmers' perceptions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 72-80.
  13. Halbich, Cestmir & Vostrovsky, Vaclav, 2012. "Monitoring of infection pressure of American Foulbrood disease by means of Google Maps," AGRIS on-line Papers in Economics and Informatics, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Faculty of Economics and Management, vol. 4(4), December.

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