Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

The impact of population aging on income inequality in developing countries: Evidence from rural China

Contents:

Author Info

  • Zhong, Hai

Abstract

Population aging is an emerging issue in developing countries. In this paper, we argue that it is largely responsible for the sharp increase in income inequality in rural China at the beginning of this decade. As a result of the one-child policy implemented in 1979, fewer young adults have reached working age during this period. This leads to a fall in the ratio of household members in working age. Regression-based inequality decomposition shows that labor shortages and the expansion of industrialization significantly increases the return of a higher ratio of household members in working age to household income while the distribution of this ratio becomes increasingly unequal. The interaction of two effects significantly increased income inequality in rural China.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W46-513368F-1/2/683150ce8cb3ad7d061c9f1e9d66f9a8
Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal China Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 22 (2011)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 98-107

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:98-107

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chieco

Related research

Keywords: Income inequality One-child policy Population aging Inequality decomposition China;

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Dwayne Benjamin & Loren Brandt & John Giles, 2004. "The Evolution of Income Inequality in Rural China," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 2004-654, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
  2. Liu, Gordon G. & Dow, William H. & Fu, Alex Z. & Akin, John & Lance, Peter, 2008. "Income productivity in China: On the role of health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 27-44, January.
  3. Podder, Nripesh & Chatterjee, Srikanta, 2002. "Sharing the national cake in post reform New Zealand: income inequality trends in terms of income sources," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 1-27, October.
  4. Wan, Guanghua & Zhang, Xiaobo, 2006. "Rising inequality in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 651-653, December.
  5. Wan, Guanghua & Zhou, Zhangyue, 2004. "Income Inequality in Rural China: Regression-based Decomposition Using Household Data," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  6. Wagstaff, Adam & van Doorslaer, Eddy & Watanabe, Naoko, 2003. "On decomposing the causes of health sector inequalities with an application to malnutrition inequalities in Vietnam," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 207-223, January.
  7. Jonathan Morduch & Terry Sicular, 1998. "Rethinking Inequality Decomposition, with Evidence from Rural China," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1831, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  8. Wan, Guanghua, 2004. "Accounting for income inequality in rural China: a regression-based approach," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 348-363, June.
  9. C. Y. Cyrus Chu & Lily Jiang, 1997. "Demographic Transition, Family Structure, And Income Inequality," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 665-669, November.
  10. Alan S. Blinder, 1973. "Wage Discrimination: Reduced Form and Structural Estimates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 8(4), pages 436-455.
  11. Bowlus, Audra J. & Sicular, Terry, 2003. "Moving toward markets? Labor allocation in rural China," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(2), pages 561-583, August.
  12. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
  13. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Shi, Li, 2002. "Income inequality within and across counties in rural China 1988 and 1995," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 179-204, October.
  14. Fang Cai & Meiyan Wang, 2006. "Challenge Facing China's Economic Growth in Its Aging but not Affluent Era," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 14(5), pages 20-31.
  15. Jantti, Markus, 1997. "Inequality in Five Countries in the 1980s: The Role of Demographic Shifts, Markets and Government Policies," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 64(255), pages 415-40, August.
  16. von Weizsacker, Robert K., 1996. "Distributive implications of an aging society," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-5), pages 729-746, April.
  17. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
  18. Barrett, Garry F & Crossley, Thomas F & Worswick, Christopher, 2000. "Demographic Trends and Consumption Inequality in Australia between 1975 and 1993," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(4), pages 437-56, December.
  19. Cameron, Lisa A., 2000. "Poverty and inequality in Java: examining the impact of the changing age, educational and industrial structure," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 149-180, June.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Mehlum, Halvor & Torsvik, Ragnar & Valente, Simone, 2013. "China's Savings Multiplier," Memorandum 17/2013, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  2. Steef Baeten & Tom Van Ourti & Eddy Van Doorslaer, 2012. "Rising Inequalities in Income and Health in China: Who is left behind?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 12-091/V, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Heshmati, Almas & Rudolf, Robert, 2013. "Income vs. Consumption Inequality in South Korea: Evaluating Stochastic Dominance Rankings by Various Household Attributes," IZA Discussion Papers 7731, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:22:y:2011:i:1:p:98-107. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Zhang, Lei).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.