Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Smooth transition in China: New evidence in the cointegrating money demand relationship

Contents:

Author Info

  • Anne laure Delatte

    ()
    (Rouen Business School)

  • Julien Fouquau

    ()
    (Rouen Business School and LEO)

Abstract

Using linearity tests proposed by Choi and Saikkonen (2004), this paper finds evidence of a non-linear cointegrating money demand relationship in China during the 1987-2008 period and identifies potential explanations for this non-linearity.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2010/Volume30/EB-10-V30-I1-P22.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 265-273

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00767

Contact details of provider:

Related research

Keywords: China Money Demand; Non-linearity; Cointegrating STR.;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Chien-Chiang Lee & Mei-Se Chien, 2008. "Stability of money demand function revisited in China," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(24), pages 3185-3197.
  2. González, Andrés & Teräsvirta, Timo & van Dijk, Dick, 2005. "Panel Smooth Transition Regression Models," Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 604, Stockholm School of Economics.
  3. Dick van Dijk & Timo Terasvirta & Philip Hans Franses, 2002. "Smooth Transition Autoregressive Models — A Survey Of Recent Developments," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-47.
  4. Jesus Gonzalo & Jean-Yves Pitarakis, 2006. "Threshold effects in cointegrating relationships," Economics Working Papers we20060621, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.
  5. Engle, Robert F & Granger, Clive W J, 1987. "Co-integration and Error Correction: Representation, Estimation, and Testing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 55(2), pages 251-76, March.
  6. In Choi & Pentti Saikkonen, 2004. "Testing linearity in cointegrating smooth transition regressions," Econometrics Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 7(2), pages 341-365, December.
  7. Bernard Laurens & Rodolfo Maino, 2007. "China," IMF Working Papers 07/14, International Monetary Fund.
  8. MacKinnon, James G. & White, Halbert, 1985. "Some heteroskedasticity-consistent covariance matrix estimators with improved finite sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 305-325, September.
  9. Chow, Gregory C., 1987. "Money and price level determination in China," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(3), pages 319-333, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Fredj Jawadi & Sushanta K. Mallick & Ricardo M. Sousa, 2011. "Monetary Policy Rules in the BRICS: How Important is Nonlinearity?," NIPE Working Papers, NIPE - Universidade do Minho 18/2011, NIPE - Universidade do Minho.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-09-00767. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (John P. Conley).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.