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Trends in Marital Dissolution by Women's Education in the United States

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  • Steven P. Martin

    (University of Maryland)

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    Abstract

    I use the Survey of Income and Program Participation (N = 16,452) to measure trends in marital dissolution rates for U.S. women by education level. In marriage cohorts from the mid-1970s to the 1990s, marital dissolution rates fell among women with a 4-year college degree or more, but remained high among women with less than a 4-year college degree. This diverging trend began in the mid-1970s and is not explained by recent increases in women's overall educational attainment, nor by recent increases in age at marriage timing and premarital childbearing. These results suggest a growing association between socioeconomic disadvantage and family instability.

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    File URL: http://www.demographic-research.org/volumes/vol15/20/15-20.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany in its journal Demographic Research.

    Volume (Year): 15 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 20 (December)
    Pages: 537-560

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    Handle: RePEc:dem:demres:v:15:y:2006:i:20

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    Web page: http://www.demogr.mpg.de/

    Related research

    Keywords: education; family demography; marital dissolution; social inequality;

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    Cited by:
    1. Heggeness, Misty L., 2009. "Evidence of shifts in intra-household allocation under exogenous changes in family policy and administrative procedures: The case of school enrollment in Chile," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49450, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    2. Lucia Coppola & Mariachiara Di Cesare, 2008. "How fertility and union stability interact in shaping new family patterns in Italy and Spain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 18(4), pages 117-144, March.
    3. Matthijs Kalmijn, 2013. "The Educational Gradient in Marriage: A Comparison of 25 European Countries," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(4), pages 1499-1520, August.
    4. James M. Raymo & Setsuya Fukuda & Miho Iwasawa, 2013. "Educational Differences in Divorce in Japan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(6), pages 177-206, January.
    5. Wan-Chi Chen, 2012. "The Changing Pattern of Educational Differentials in Divorce in the Context of Gender Egalitarianization: The Case of Taiwan," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 31(6), pages 831-853, December.
    6. Christine Schwartz & Robert Mare, 2012. "The Proximate Determinants of Educational Homogamy: The Effects of First Marriage, Marital Dissolution, Remarriage, and Educational Upgrading," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 629-650, May.
    7. Richard Lampard, 2013. "Age at marriage and the risk of divorce in England and Wales," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(7), pages 167-202, July.
    8. Hellerstein, Judith K. & Morrill, Melinda Sandler & Zou, Ben, 2013. "Business cycles and divorce: Evidence from microdata," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 118(1), pages 68-70.

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