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Southern Agrarian Labor Contracts as Impediments to Cotton Mechanization

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  • Whatley, Warren C.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Cambridge University Press in its journal The Journal of Economic History.

Volume (Year): 47 (1987)
Issue (Month): 01 (March)
Pages: 45-70

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Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:47:y:1987:i:01:p:45-70_04

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Cited by:
  1. Virts, Nancy, 2006. "Change in the plantation system: American South, 1910-1945," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 153-176, January.
  2. Martha J. Bailey & Nicolas J. Duquette, 2014. "How Johnson Fought the War on Poverty: The Economics and Politics of Funding at the Office of Economic Opportunity," NBER Working Papers 19860, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. David A. Hennessy, 2004. "On Monoculture and the Structure of Crop Rotations," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 04-wp369, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  4. Richard Hornbeck & Suresh Naidu, 2014. "When the Levee Breaks: Black Migration and Economic Development in the American South," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(3), pages 963-90, March.
  5. Joshua L. Rosenbloom & William A. Sundstrom, 2009. "Labor-Market Regimes in U.S. Economic History," NBER Working Papers 15055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Paul A. David, . "Zvi Griliches and the Economics of Technology Diffusion: Adoption of Innovations, Investment Lags, and Productivity Growth," Discussion Papers 09-016, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, revised Mar 2010.
  7. Jeanne Lafortune & José Tessada & Carolina González-Velosa, 2013. "More Hands, More Power? Estimating the Impact of Immigration on Output and Technology Choices Using Early 20th Century US Agriculture," Documentos de Trabajo 431, Instituto de Economia. Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile..

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