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Union Incidence in the Public and Private Sectors

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  • Chris Robinson

Abstract

Union density in the public sector is approximately twice the level of that in the private sector in both Canada and the United States. Canadian data are particularly useful for analyzing differences between the public and private sectors because of several industries that have a substantial overlap of ownership between sectors. Sectors therefore may be compared while holding the industry constant. Evidence is presented suggesting that union cost factors, as related to the size of the 'plants,' are important in explaining the high density in the public sector. Employee characteristics appear to play no role. The connection between wage differentials and public sector unionism is also addressed.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Canadian Economics Association in its journal Canadian Journal of Economics.

Volume (Year): 28 (1995)
Issue (Month): 4b (November)
Pages: 1056-76

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Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:28:y:1995:i:4b:p:1056-76

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Postal: Canadian Economics Association Prof. Steven Ambler, Secretary-Treasurer c/o Olivier Lebert, CEA/CJE/CPP Office C.P. 35006, 1221 Fleury Est Montréal, Québec, Canada H2C 3K4
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Cited by:
  1. Fernàndez-de-Córdoba, Gonzalo & Pérez, Javier J. & Torres, José L., 2009. "Public and private sector wages interactions in a general equilibrium model," Working Paper Series 1099, European Central Bank.
  2. Carrère, Céline & Fugazza, Marco & Olarreaga, Marcelo & Robert-Nicoud, Frédéric, 2014. "Trade in Unemployment," CEPR Discussion Papers 9916, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Jean Farès & Terence Yuen, 2003. "Technological Change and the Education Premium in Canada: Sectoral Evidence," Working Papers 03-18, Bank of Canada.
  4. Gregory, Robert G. & Borland, Jeff, 1999. "Recent developments in public sector labor markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 53, pages 3573-3630 Elsevier.
  5. Mueller, Richard E., 1998. "Public-private sector wage differentials in Canada: evidence from quantile regressions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 229-235, August.

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