Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Using Quality of Interview Information to Assess Nonrandom Attrition Bias in Developing-Country Panel Data

Contents:

Author Info

  • John A. Maluccio

Abstract

Panel data often provide an understanding of household behavior not possible with cross-sectional information alone. However, a disturbing feature of such data is that there can be substantial, nonrandom attrition and many analysts share the concern that this inhibits the ability to make accurate inferences. The author examines attrition in the KwaZulu-Natal Income Dynamics Study 1993-1998, assesses the extent of attrition bias for a specific empirical example, and proposes and implements a selection correction methodology using quality of first round interview variables as identifying instruments. The results show that attrition does lead to statistical bias in the "behavioral" coefficients in estimation of household-level expenditure functions. Since it is typically difficult to determine the bias for a particular analysis a priori, and such bias is by its nature model-specific, it behooves researchers using panel data to evaluate the effects of attrition in their analyses. Copyright Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2004.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=rode&volume=8&issue=1&year=2004&part=null
File Function: link to full text
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 8 (2004)
Issue (Month): 1 (02)
Pages: 91-109

as in new window
Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:8:y:2004:i:1:p:91-109

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1363-6669

Order Information:
Web: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/subs.asp?ref=1363-6669

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Alderman, Harold & Watkins, Susan Cotts & Kohler, Hans-Peter & Maluccio, John A. & Behrman, Jere R., 2000. "Attrition in longitudinal household survey data," FCND briefs 96, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Thomas, Duncan & Witoelar, Firman & Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Sikoki, Bondan & Strauss, John & Sumantri, Cecep & Suriastini, Wayan, 2012. "Cutting the costs of attrition: Results from the Indonesia Family Life Survey," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 98(1), pages 108-123.
  3. Akresh, Richard & Edmonds, Eric V., 2010. "The Analytical Returns to Measuring a Detailed Household Roster," IZA Discussion Papers 4759, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Haddad, Lawrence James & Maluccio, John A., 2002. "Trust, membership in groups, and household welfare," FCND briefs 135, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. World Bank, 2005. "Central America : Education Strategy Paper," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8397, The World Bank.
  6. Nobuhiko Fuwa, 2010. "Should We Track Migrant Households When Collecting Household Panel Data? Household Relocation, Economic Mobility, and Attrition Biases in the Rural Philippines," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 93(1), pages 56-82.
  7. Ueno, Yuko, 2014. "Updating Behavior of Inflation Expectations: Evidence from Japanese Household Panel Data," CIS Discussion paper series 617, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Nic Baigrie & Katherine Eyal, 2013. "An evaluation of the determinants and implications of panel attrition in the National Income Dynamics Survey (2008 – 2010)," SALDRU Working Papers 103, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  9. Tefera, Nigussie, 2012. "Welfare Impacts of Rising Food Prices in Rural Ethiopia: a Quadratic Almost Ideal Demand System Approach," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126698, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  10. Farshid Vahid & Pushkar Maitra, 2005. "The Effect of Household Characteristics on Living Standards in South Africa 1993 - 98: A Quantile Regression Analysis with Sample Attrition," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2005-452, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  11. Carter, Michael R. & Maluccio, John A., 2002. "Social capital and coping with economic shocks," FCND briefs 142, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Ueyama, Mika, 2007. "Mortality, mobility, and schooling outcomes among orphans: Evidence from Malawi," IFPRI discussion papers 710, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:8:y:2004:i:1:p:91-109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.