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Family Background, Education and Employment in Urban Ethiopia

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  • Krishnan, Pramila

Abstract

Most studies suggest that family background has strong effect on earnings both directly and indirectly through the returns to own education. However, such effects might reflect the influence of family background on entry into work rather than a productive effect on earnings. The paper uses data from a survey of sixteen to twenty-nine year olds in urban Ethiopia to examine the impact of family background on selection into work and earnings. Family background strongly influences entry into the public sector; accounting for such selection removes its impact on earnings. This contrasts with the persistence of family background effects on private sector earnings. Copyright 1996 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Department of Economics, University of Oxford in its journal Oxford Bulletin of Economics & Statistics.

Volume (Year): 58 (1996)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 167-83

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Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:58:y:1996:i:1:p:167-83

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Cited by:
  1. Monazza Aslam, 2006. "Rates of Return to Education by Gender in Pakistan," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-064, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  2. Pieter Serneels, 2002. "Explaining Non-Negative Duration Dependence Among the Unemployed," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2002-13, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Pieter Serneels, 2004. "The Nature of Unemployment in Urban Ethiopia," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-01, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Pieter Serneels, 2002. "The added worked effect and intra household aspects of unemployment," CSAE Working Paper Series 2002-14, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  5. Sharada Weir, 1999. "The effects of education on farmer productivity in rural Ethiopia," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1999-07, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. Sharada Weir, 1999. "The effects of education on farmer productivity in rural Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 1999-07, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  7. Pramila Krishnan & Tesfaye Gebre Selassie & Stefan Dercon, 1998. "The urban labour market during structural adjustment: Ethiopia 1990-1997," CSAE Working Paper Series 1998-09, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  8. Sourafel Girma & Abbi Kedir, 2005. "Heterogeneity in returns to schooling: Econometric evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 1405-1416.
  9. Wambugu, Anthony, 2002. "Family Background, Education and Earnings in Kenya," Working Papers in Economics 76, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  10. Tushar Agrawal, 2011. "Returns to education in India: Some recent evidence," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2011-017, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  11. Shahin Yaqub, 2003. "Relating Severe Poverty and Chronic Poverty," Working Papers wpdea0307, Department of Applied Economics at Universitat Autonoma of Barcelona.
  12. Arne Bigsten & Paul Collier & Stefan Dercon & Marcel Fafchamps & Bernard Gauthier & Jan Willem Gunning & Anders Isaksson & Abena Oduro & Remco Oostendorp & Cathy Pattillo & Måns Söderbom & Francis T, 1998. "Rates of return on physical and human capital in Africa's manufacturing sector," CSAE Working Paper Series 1998-12, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
  13. Basu, Kaushik & Narayan, Ambar & Ravallion, Martin, 2001. "Is literacy shared within households? Theory and evidence for Bangladesh," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(6), pages 649-665, December.
  14. Simon Appleton & John Hoddinott & John MacKinnon, 1996. "Education and health in sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 307-339.

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