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Asia's contribution to global rebalancing

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  • Cyn‐Young Park
  • Charles Adams
  • Hoe Yun Jeong

Abstract

Developing Asia remains at the core of global payment imbalances. While the geographical concentration of current account imbalances is rather significant, with the People’s Republic of China accounting for the lion’s share of the region’s current account surplus, how Asia contributes to global rebalancing also depends critically on the NIEs and larger ASEAN economies. Given the region’s huge diversity, the necessary national macroeconomic and structural policies will vary significantly across Asia’s emerging economies. Whereas near-term rebalancing efforts will be driven primarily by macroeconomic and exchange rate policies, medium- to long-term measures will involve policies and structural reforms directed to boost domestic and regional demand as a source of economic growth. In this paper, we argue that regional rebalancing will depend critically on the adoption of deeper and more comprehensive structural reforms and further trade liberalization that promote domestic spending—thus reducing Asia’s high dependence on extra regional demand. Priority policies should include infrastructure spending, competition, trade, financial development, investment, immigration, and other social policies to reduce national savings.

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-8411.2011.01310.x
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Asia Pacific School of Economics and Government, The Australian National University in its journal Asian-Pacific Economic Literature.

Volume (Year): 25 (2011)
Issue (Month): 2 (November)
Pages: 38-51

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Handle: RePEc:bla:apacel:v:25:y:2011:i:2:p:38-51

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  1. Cyn-Young Park & Ruperto P. Majuca & Josef T. Yap, 2010. "The 2008 Financial Crisis and Potential Output in Asia : Impact and Policy Implications," Finance Working Papers 23101, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
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Cited by:
  1. Hong Bum Jang, 2011. "Financial Integration and Cooperation in East Asia: Assessment of Recent Developments and Their Implications," IMES Discussion Paper Series 11-E-05, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
  2. Chin, Gregory, 2012. "Responding to the Global Financial Crisis: The Evolution of Asian Regionalism and Economic Globalization," ADBI Working Papers 343, Asian Development Bank Institute.

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