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Where Ricardo and Mill Rebut and Confirm Arguments of Mainstream Economists Supporting Globalization

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  • Paul A. Samuelson

Abstract

Autarky real per capita well being, does not deny that new technical Chinese progress in goods that America previously had competitive advantage in can, ceteris paribus, lower permanently measurable per capita U.S. real income. Nor does it deny that technical progress in China's export goods can, ceteris paribus, hurt permanently her own net measurable per capita real income itself when demand inelasticity prevails. Ergo, the winds of dynamic comparative advantage cannot be counted on to create in each region new net gains of the gainers assuredly greater than the new net losses of the losers. However, correct Ricardian theory does imply that worldwide real income per capita does gain net, so that winners' winnings will suffice worldwide to more than compensate losers' losings--some cold comfort in a scenario of many semi-autonomous nations.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal Journal of Economic Perspectives.

Volume (Year): 18 (2004)
Issue (Month): 3 (Summer)
Pages: 135-146

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Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:18:y:2004:i:3:p:135-146

Note: DOI: 10.1257/0895330042162403
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  1. Simon Kuznets, 1946. "National Income: A Summary of Findings," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number kuzn46-2.
  2. Samuelson, Paul A, 1974. "Complementarity-An Essay on the 40th Anniversary of the Hicks-Allen Revolution in Demand Theory," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 1255-89, December.
  3. R. Dornbusch & S. Fischer & P. A. Samuelson, 1976. "Comparative Advantage, Trade and Payments in a Ricardian Model With a Continuum of Goods," Working papers 178, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  4. Mill, John Stuart, 1874. "Essays on Some Unsettled Questions of Political Economy," History of Economic Thought Books, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, edition 2, number mill1874.
  5. Simon Kuznets, 1946. "Introduction to "National Income: A Summary of Findings"," NBER Chapters, in: National Income: A Summary of Findings, pages 1-2 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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