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Recruiting Intensity during and after the Great Recession: National and Industry Evidence

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  • Steven J. Davis
  • R. Jason Faberman
  • John C. Haltiwanger

Abstract

We measure job-filling rates and recruiting intensity per vacancy at the national and industry levels from January 2001 to September 2011 using data from the Job Openings and Labor Turnover Survey. Industry-level movements in these variables are at odds with implications of the standard matching function in labor search theory but consistent with a generalized function that incorporates an important role for recruiting intensity. Construction makes up less than five percent of employment but accounts for more than 40 percent of the large swings in the job-filling rate during and after the Great Recession.

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File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.584
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by American Economic Association in its journal American Economic Review.

Volume (Year): 102 (2012)
Issue (Month): 3 (May)
Pages: 584-88

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Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:584-88

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  1. Steven J. Davis & R. Jason Faberman & John C. Haltiwanger, 2010. "The Establishment-Level Behavior of Vacancies and Hiring," NBER Working Papers 16265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Regis Barnichon & Andrew Figura, 2011. "What drives matching efficiency? a tale of composition and dispersion," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2011-10, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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Cited by:
  1. Ayşegül Şahin & Joseph Song & Giorgio Topa & Giovanni L. Violante, 2012. "Mismatch Unemployment," NBER Working Papers 18265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Luca Sala & Ulf S�derstr�m & Antonella Trigari, 2013. "Structural and Cyclical Forces in the Labor Market during the Great Recession: Cross-Country Evidence," NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(1), pages 345 - 404.
  3. Dave Reifschneider & William Wascher & David Wilcox, 2013. "Aggregate supply in the United States: recent developments and implications for the conduct of monetary policy," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-77, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).

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