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Bullet Proof? Program Evaluation in Conflict Areas: Evidence from Rural Colombia

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  • Wald, Nina
  • Bozzoli, Carlos

Abstract

Recently, Conditional Cash Transfer Programs (CCT) became increasingly popular in developing countries due to their positive outcomes on health and education. In this paper, we are particularly interested in testing if children participating in CCT (treated) in conflict affected regions benefit more (or less) than their counterparts in peaceful areas. To test this, we combine longitudinal CCT data from Colombia with a conflict event dataset. This allows us to use standard techniques in treatment evaluation, but it augments the testing equations by adding interactions between dummies identifying different groups and indicators of violence. We find that the CCT program had an extra benefit in conflict areas concerning enrolment. However, grade progression is similar for treated children in low and high conflict regions. Results suggest that the program may work in attracting children to school, but in high conflict regions children tend to do less homework and miss more days in school. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics in its series Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 with number 80.

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Date of creation: 2011
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:gdec11:80

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Keywords: Conditional Cash Transfer Program; Education; Conflict; Colombia; Panel Data; Treatment Effects;

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References

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  1. James D. Fearon & Macartan Humphreys & Jeremy M. Weinstein, 2009. "Can Development Aid Contribute to Social Cohesion after Civil War? Evidence from a Field Experiment in Post-conflict Liberia," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(2), pages 287-91, May.
  2. Arturo Harker & Marcela Melendez, 2008. "Revisiting Economic Growth in Colombia: A Microeconomic Perspective," Research Department Publications 2006, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  3. Felipe Barrera-Osorio & Marianne Bertrand & Leigh L. Linden & Francisco Perez-Calle, 2008. "Conditional Cash Transfers in Education Design Features, Peer and Sibling Effects Evidence from a Randomized Experiment in Colombia," NBER Working Papers 13890, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Yashodhan Ghorpade, 2012. "Coping Strategies in Natural Disasters and under Conflict: A Review of Household Responses and Notes for Public Policy," HiCN Working Papers 136, Households in Conflict Network.

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