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Asymmetric Information and the Excess Volatility of Stock Prices

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Author Info

  • Eden, B.
  • Jovanovic, B.

Abstract

Evidence suggests the volatility of stock prices cannot be accounted for by information about future dividends. The authors argue that some of the volatility of stock prices in excess of fundamentals results from fluctuations in the amount of public information over time. Their model assumes that dividends and consumption are constant in the aggregate but that there are good firms and bad firms whose identity may be unknown to the public, as in George Akerlof's (1970) 'lemons' problem. In that case, the collective valuation of the constant dividend stream depends on the degree of informational asymmetry. Copyright 1994 by Oxford University Press.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Iowa, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 92-18.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: 1992
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uia:iowaec:92-18

Contact details of provider:
Postal: University of Iowa, Department of Economics, Henry B. Tippie College of Business, Iowa City, Iowa 52242
Phone: (319) 335-0829
Fax: (319) 335-1956
Web page: http://tippie.uiowa.edu/economics/
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Related research

Keywords: information ; prices ; stock market;

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Cited by:
  1. John Y. Campbell & Martin Lettau, 1999. "Dispersion and Volatility in Stock Returns: An Empirical Investigation," NBER Working Papers 7144, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Aiyagari, S.R. & Gertler, M., 1998. ""Overreaction" of Asset Prices in General Equilibrium," Working Papers 98-25, C.V. Starr Center for Applied Economics, New York University.
  3. Matthew Spiegel, 1996. "Stock Price Volatility in a Multiple Security Overlapping Generations Model," Finance 9608002, EconWPA.
  4. John Y. Campbell & Martin Lettau & Burton G. Malkiel & Yexiao Xu, 2000. "Have Individual Stocks Become More Volatile? An Empirical Exploration of Idiosyncratic Risk," NBER Working Papers 7590, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Chow, William W. & Fung, Michael K., 2008. "Volatility of stock price as predicted by patent data: An MGARCH perspective," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 64-79, January.
  6. Crouzille, Celine & Lepetit, Laetitia & Tarazi, Amine, 2004. "Bank stock volatility, news and asymmetric information in banking: an empirical investigation," Journal of Multinational Financial Management, Elsevier, vol. 14(4-5), pages 443-461.

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