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Inter Vivos Health Transfers: Final Days of Japanese Elderly Parents

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  • Shiko Maruyama

    ()
    (School of Economics, The University of New South Wales)

Abstract

The empirical evidence of the effect of intergenerational coresidence by elderly parents and their adult children on parental health remains fairly inconclusive. The aim of this paper is twofold: (1) to estimate a reliable coresidence effect and (2) to investigate why the coresidence effect can be negative. I argue that coresidence may worsen parental health, with coresidence burdens on children creating disincentives for parents to invest in their health. Studying Japanese data reveals: (i) an insignificant, negative average treatment effect of coresidence; (ii) a significant, negative treatment effect on the treated; and (iii) that parents with high care needs and limited resources, typically widowed mothers, are in coresidence experiencing the largest negative impact. Results are consistent with the theory predictions. In particular, what leads to the negative coresidence effect is not the base period health status but coresidence burdens, such as disability and dementia.

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File URL: http://research.economics.unsw.edu.au/RePEc/papers/2012-20.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School of Economics, The University of New South Wales in its series Discussion Papers with number 2012-20.

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Length: 56 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:swe:wpaper:2012-20

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Related research

Keywords: intergenerational transfers; health investment; informal care; heterogeneous treatment effects; selection on unobservables; coresidence; structural equations.;

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References

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  1. Becker, Gary S, 1974. "A Theory of Social Interactions," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 82(6), pages 1063-93, Nov.-Dec..
  2. James Heckman, 1997. "Instrumental Variables: A Study of Implicit Behavioral Assumptions Used in Making Program Evaluations," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 32(3), pages 441-462.
  3. A. Walter-Ginzburg & T. Blumstein & A. Chetrit & B. Modan, 2002. "Social Factors and Mortality in the Old-Old in Israel," Journals of Gerontology: Series B, Gerontological Society of America, vol. 57(5), pages S308-S318.
  4. Bernheim, B Douglas & Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H, 1985. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(6), pages 1045-76, December.
  5. Grossman, Michael, 1972. "On the Concept of Health Capital and the Demand for Health," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 80(2), pages 223-55, March-Apr.
  6. Cox, Donald, 1987. "Motives for Private Income Transfers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 95(3), pages 508-46, June.
  7. Lund, Rikke & Due, Pernille & Modvig, Jens & Holstein, Bjørn Evald & Damsgaard, Mogens Trab & Andersen, Per Kragh, 2002. "Cohabitation and marital status as predictors of mortality--an eight year follow-up study," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 673-679, August.
  8. Li, Lydia W. & Zhang, Jiaan & Liang, Jersey, 2009. "Health among the oldest-old in China: Which living arrangements make a difference?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 220-227, January.
  9. Aakvik, Arild & Heckman, James J. & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2005. "Estimating treatment effects for discrete outcomes when responses to treatment vary: an application to Norwegian vocational rehabilitation programs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 15-51.
  10. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama & Sayaka Nakamura, 2010. "Transition to Parent-Child Coresidence: Parental Needs and the Strategic Bequest Motive," Discussion Papers 2010-05, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
  11. Edward C. Norton & Courtney Harold Van Houtven, 2006. "Inter-vivos Transfers and Exchange," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 73(1), pages 157–172, July.
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Cited by:
  1. Meliyanni Johar & Shiko Maruyama, 2012. "Externality and Strategic Interaction in the Location Choice of Siblings under Altruism toward Parents," Working Papers 201201, ARC Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research (CEPAR), Australian School of Business, University of New South Wales.
  2. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2013. "Informal Care and intergenerational transfers in European Countries," Working Papers 2013-25, FEDEA.

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