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The new economics of the brain drain

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Author Info

  • Stark, Oded

Abstract

For nearly four decades now, the conventional wisdom has been that the migration of human capital (skilled workers) from a developing country to a developed country is detrimental to the developing country. However, this perception need not hold. A well designed migration policy can result in a “brain gain” to the developing country rather than in just a “brain drain” from it, as well as in a welfare increase for all of its workers - migrants and non-migrants alike - as new research suggests.

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File URL: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/30939/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 30939.

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Date of creation: 2005
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in World Economics 2.6(2005): pp. 137-140
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:30939

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Web page: http://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de
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Related research

Keywords: migration; human capital formation; externalities; social welfare;

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Cited by:
  1. Jan-Jan Soon, 2009. "When do students intend to return? Determinants of students' return intentions using a multinomial logit model," Working Papers 0906, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Jun 2009.
  2. Stark, Oded & Dorn, Agnieszka, 2013. "International migration, human capital formation, and saving," Discussion Papers 143842, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
  3. Satish Chand & Michael A. Clemens, 2008. "Skilled emigration and skill creation: A quasi-experiment," International and Development Economics Working Papers idec08-05, International and Development Economics.
  4. Javier Arias & Oliver Azuara & Pedro Bernal & James J. Heckman & Cajeme Villarreal, 2010. "Policies To Promote Growth and Economic Efficiency in Mexico," NBER Working Papers 16554, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Bertoli Simone, 2006. "Remittances and the Dynamics of Human Capitalin the Recipient Country," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 200607, University of Turin.
  6. Stark, Oded & Fan, C. Simon, 2007. "The Brain Drain, "Educated Unemployment," Human Capital Formation, and Economic Betterment," Discussion Papers 7122, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
  7. Simona Monteleone & Benedetto Torrisi, 2010. "A micro data analysis of Italy’s brain drain," Discussion Papers 4_2010, D.E.S. (Department of Economic Studies), University of Naples "Parthenope", Italy.
  8. Monteleone, Simona & Torrisi, Benedetto, 2010. "A Micro Data Analisys Of Italy’s Brain Drain," MPRA Paper 20995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  9. Driouchi, Ahmed & Boboc, Cristina & Zouag, Nada, 2009. "Emigration of Highly Skilled Labor: Determinants & Impacts," MPRA Paper 21567, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 23 Mar 2010.
  10. Thomas Straubhaar & Achim Wolter, 1996. "Current issues in European migration," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 31(6), pages 267-276, November.
  11. J. Edward Taylor, 2006. "The relationship between international migration, trade, and development: some paradoxes and findings," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, pages 199-212.
  12. Fargues, Philippe, 2006. "The demographic benefit of international migration : hypothesis and application to the Middle Eastern and North African contexts," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4050, The World Bank.

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