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The Consequences of Urban Air Pollution for Child Health: What does Self Reporting Data in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area Reveal?

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  • Mia Amalia
  • Budy P. Resosudarmo
  • Jeff Bennett

Abstract

Since the early 1990s, the air pollution level in the Jakarta Metropolitan Area (JMA) has arguably been one of the highest among mega cities in developing countries. This paper utilises the self-reporting data on illnesses available in the 2004 National Socio-Economic Household Survey (Survei Sosial Ekonomi Nasional, or SUSENAS) to test the hypothesis that air pollution impacts human health, particularly among children, in JMA. Test results confirm that air pollution, represented by the PM10 level in a sub-district, does significantly correlate with the level of human health problems, represented by the number of restricted activity days (RAD) in the previous month. The results also show that a given level of PM10 concentration is more hazardous for children.

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File URL: https://crawford.anu.edu.au/acde/publications/publish/papers/wp2013/wp_econ_2013_09.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The Australian National University, Arndt-Corden Department of Economics in its series Departmental Working Papers with number 2013-09.

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Length: 27 pages
Date of creation: 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pas:papers:2013-09

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Keywords: Air pollution; environmental economics; health economics and exposure response model;

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  1. Elizabeth Frankenberg & Douglas McKee & Duncan Thomas, 2005. "Health consequences of forest fires in Indonesia," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 109-129, February.
  2. Budy P. Resosudarmo & Lucentezza Napitupulu, 2004. "Health and Economic Impact of Air Pollution in Jakarta," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages S65-S75, 09.
  3. Yusuf, Arief Anshory & Resosudarmo, Budy P., 2009. "Does clean air matter in developing countries' megacities? A hedonic price analysis of the Jakarta housing market, Indonesia," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(5), pages 1398-1407, March.
  4. World Bank, 2006. "World Development Indicators 2006," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 8151, August.
  5. Chay, Kenneth & Dobkin, Carlos & Greenstone, Michael, 2003. " The Clean Air Act of 1970 and Adult Mortality," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 27(3), pages 279-300, December.
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