Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Social and Economic Impact of Native American Casinos

Contents:

Author Info

  • William N. Evans
  • Julie H. Topoleski

Abstract

In the late 1980s, a series of legal rulings favorable to tribes and the subsequent passage of the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 legalized gaming operations on reservations in many states. Today, there are over 310 gaming operations run by more than 200 of the nations' 556 federally-recognized tribes. Of these operations, about 220 are Las Vegas' style casinos with slot machines and/or table games. We use a simple difference-in-difference framework where we compare economic outcomes before and after tribes open casinos to outcomes over the same period for tribes that do not adopt or are prohibited from adopting gaming. Four years after tribes open casinos, employment has increased by 26 percent, and tribal population has increased by about 12 percent, resulting in an increase in employment to population ratios of five percentage points or about 12 percent. The fraction of adults who work but are poor has declined by 14 percent. Tribal gaming operations seem to have both positive and negative spillovers in the surrounding communities. In counties where an Indian-owned casino opens, we find that jobs per adult increase by about five percent of the median value. Given the size of tribes relative to their counties, most of this growth in employment is due to growth in non-Native American employment. The increase in economic activity appears to have some health benefits in that four or more years after a casino opens, mortality has fallen by 2 percent in a county with a casino and an amount half that in counties near a casino. Casinos do, however, come at some cost. Four years after a casino opens, bankruptcy rates, violent crime, and auto thefts and larceny are up 10 percent in counties with a casino.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w9198.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9198.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2002
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9198

Note: PE
Contact details of provider:
Postal: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge, MA 02138, U.S.A.
Phone: 617-868-3900
Email:
Web page: http://www.nber.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Voxi Heinrich S Amavilah, 2004. "Human Capital: Infrastructural and Superstructural Constraints to Economic Performance across U.S. Native American Reservations and Trust Lands," GE, Growth, Math methods 0405001, EconWPA.
  2. Sara B. Heller & Brian A. Jacob & Jens Ludwig, 2010. "Family Income, Neighborhood Poverty, and Crime," NBER Chapters, in: Controlling Crime: Strategies and Tradeoffs, pages 419-459 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hyclak, Thomas, 2011. "Casinos and campus crime," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 31-33, July.
  4. Huang, Haifang & Humphreys, Brad & Zhou, Li, 2014. "Urban Casinos and Local Housing Markets: Evidence from the US," Working Papers 2014-4, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
  5. Aragon, Fernando & Rud, Juan, 2009. "The Blessing of Natural Resources: Evidence from a Peruvian Gold Mine," Working Papers 2009-014, Banco Central de Reserva del PerĂº.
  6. Melissa S. Kearney, 2005. "The Economic Winners and Losers of Legalized Gambling," NBER Working Papers 11234, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Thomas A. Garrett & Mark W. Nichols, 2006. "Do Casinos Export Bankruptcy?," Working Papers 06-003, University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Economics & University of Nevada, Reno , Department of Resource Economics.
  8. Earl L. Grinols & David B. Mustard, 2006. "Casinos, Crime, and Community Costs," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(1), pages 28-45, February.
  9. Voxi Heinrich S Amavilah, 2005. "Human Capital and Income across U.S. Native American Reservations and Trust Lands," GE, Growth, Math methods 0505001, EconWPA.
  10. Tara Watson, 2005. "Public Health Investments and the Infant Mortality Gap: Evidence from Federal Sanitation Interventions on U.S. Indian Reservations," Department of Economics Working Papers 2005-02, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  11. Humphreys, Brad & Marchand, Joseph, 2012. "New Casinos and Local Labor Markets: Evidence from Canada," Working Papers 2012-16, University of Alberta, Department of Economics, revised 01 Nov 2012.
  12. Benjamin J. Keys, 2010. "The credit market consequences of job displacement," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2010-24, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  13. Moretti, Enrico, 2004. "Bidding for Industrial Plants: Does Winning a 'Million Dollar Plant' Increase Welfare?," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt5cz0h23t, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  14. William Evans & Wooyoung Kim, 2006. "The Impact of Local Labor Market Conditions on the Demand for Education: Evidence from Indian Casinos," Working Papers 06-14, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
  15. Michael Wenz, 2008. "Matching estimation, casino gambling and the quality of life," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 235-249, March.
  16. Barbara Wolfe & Jessica Jakubowski & Robert Haveman & Marissa Courey, 2012. "The Income and Health Effects of Tribal Casino Gaming on American Indians," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(2), pages 499-524, May.
  17. Daniel M. Hungerman, 2011. "Do Religious Proscriptions Matter? Evidence from a Theory-Based Test," NBER Working Papers 17375, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  18. Moellman, Nicholas & Mitra, Aparna, 2013. "Indian gaming in Oklahoma: Implications for community welfare," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 64-70.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9198. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.