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Who Leaves the City? The Influence of Ethnic Segregation and Family Ties

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  • Zorlu, Aslan

    ()
    (University of Amsterdam)

Abstract

In the last three decades, the population of Amsterdam has been ‘coloured’ due to immigration flows from abroad and a low outflow rate among these immigrants and their descendants. The question is to what extent differences in spatial mobility behaviour of migrants and natives are generated by neighbourhood characteristics – among which the level of ethnic segregation – and family ties? This article examines spatial mobility process of Amsterdam population using administrative individual data covering the entire population of the city. The analysis shows that Caribbean (Surinamese and Antillean) migrants have a higher probability of moving to suburbs while Moroccans and Turks tend to rearrange themselves within the city. The estimates reveal that neighbourhood ‘quality’ has only a modest impact on the probability of moving while family ties significantly hamper the out-mobility of all individuals. The impact of family ties is the largest for Turkish and Moroccan migrants.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 3343.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Population, Space and Place, 2009, 15 (4), 323-342
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3343

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Keywords: residential mobility; family ties; migrants;

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References

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  1. W. Clark, 1991. "Residential preferences and neighborhood racial segregation: A test of the schelling segregation model," Demography, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 1-19, February.
  2. David Card & Alexandre Mas & Jesse Rothstein, 2007. "Tipping and the Dynamics of Segregation," NBER Working Papers 13052, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Antonio Spilimbergo & Luis Ubeda, 2002. "Family Attachment and the Decision to Move by Race," IMF Working Papers 02/83, International Monetary Fund.
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Cited by:
  1. Ong, Cheng Boon & De Witte, Kristof, 2013. "Ethnic segregation and heterogeneous preferences of homeowners for housing and neighbourhood characteristics. Evidence from the Netherlands," MERIT Working Papers 061, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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