Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Institutions and Development: What We (Think We) Know, What We Would Like to Know

Contents:

Author Info

  • Paul G. Hare
  • Junior R. Davis

Abstract

This paper takes the form of an extended literature review, outlining the key ideas that will need to be developed further in the course of the IPPG Research Programme. After an extended introduction, the next two sections are conceptual, the former elucidating key concepts and definitions, the latter examining various approaches to the analysis of institutions relevant for economic growth. Then the paper reviews much of the available evidence linking institutions and growth and covers in some detail the evidence regarding economic institutions, confirming that institutions matter. However, the findings from different studies are far from consistent in terms of identifying exactly what it is that matters. Given the prevalence of weak or poorly functioning states amongst the poorest countries of the world, the paper also reviews literature on the political aspects of development, particularly in relation to the role of institutions. Likewise, the paper selectively illustrates the ideas of earlier sections through the discussion of two topics: trade policy and the institutions needed for it to work well; and institutions that make for a good business environment. The final section outlines some preliminary working hypotheses about institutions and development. While emphasising pro-poor growth throughout, the paper finds that growth itself is a fundamental, necessary condition for achieving pro-poor growth. Given that, a serious analysis of institutions and growth must pay attention to the need for institutions that foster and promote profit-seeking accumulation (without which little sustained growth is likely to occur).

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.sml.hw.ac.uk/downloads/cert/wpa/2006/dp0603.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University in its series CERT Discussion Papers with number 0603.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:0603

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Edinburgh EH14 4AS
Phone: +44(0)131 451 3497
Fax: +44(0)131 451 3497
Web page: http://www.sml.hw.ac.uk/research/cert.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: institutions; pro-poor growth; weak states; cultural issues; institutional matrix; investment and accumulation;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Mark E. Schaffer & Gerard Turley, 2001. "Effective versus statutory taxation: measuring effective tax administration in transition economies," Working Papers 62, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, Office of the Chief Economist.
  2. World Bank, 2005. "Economic Growth in the 1990s : Learning from a Decade of Reform," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 7370, October.
  3. Simeon Djankov & Peter Murrell, 2002. "Enterprise Restructuring in Transition: A Quantitative Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 739-792, September.
  4. Laffont, Jean-Jacques & Meleu, Mathieu, 1999. "A Positive Theory of Privatisation for Sub-Saharan Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(0), pages 30-67, December.
  5. Friedrich Schneider, 2005. "Shadow Economies of 145 Countries all over the World: What Do We Really Know?," CREMA Working Paper Series 2005-13, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
  6. Rafael La Porta & Florencio López-De-Silanes, 1999. "The Benefits Of Privatization: Evidence From Mexico," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 114(4), pages 1193-1242, November.
  7. repec:fth:galeco:50 is not listed on IDEAS
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Okojie, Christiana & Monye-Emina, A. & Eghafona, K. & Osaghae, G. & Ehiakhamen, J.O., 2009. "Institutional environment and access to microfinance by self-employed women in the rural areas of Edo state, Nigeria:," NSSP working papers 3, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Bakanova, Marina & Estrin, Saul & Pelipas, Igor & Pukovich, Sergei, 2006. "Enterprise Restructuring in Belarus," IZA Discussion Papers 2148, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Marina Bakanova, & Saul Estrin & Igor Pelipas & Sergei Pukovic, 2006. "Enterprise Restructuring in Belarus," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 823, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hwe:certdp:0603. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Professor Mark Schaffer) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Professor Mark Schaffer to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.