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The 2010 World Cup High-Frequency Data Economics: Effects on International Awareness and (Self-Defeating) Tourism

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Author Info

  • Stan Du Plessis

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Faculty of Economic and Management Sciences, University of Stellenbosch)

  • Wolfgang Maennig

    ()
    (Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg)

Abstract

Without a doubt, the 2010 World Cup of soccer in South Africa was a great experience for both soccer fans, who enjoyed a safe and efficiently-run tournament, and their South African hosts. The sporting and social spectacle was broadcast around the world and focused unprecedented media attention on South Africa. Despite the manifest success of the tournament, its short-term effects on international tourism, which are the nucleus of all other short-term positive effects on economic variables such as employment, income and taxes, have turned out to be of a much smaller magnitude than expected or even as reported during the tournament. This may be attributable to self-defeating prophecy effects. This study is a warning against the abuse of economic impact studies, especially those pertaining to major sporting events. It is also a call to use the “correct” arguments of measurable awareness effects and potential long-term development effects in discussing major sporting events. Methodologically, this study is innovative in its economic analysis of major sporting events because it (i) uses data from social networks and (ii) uses high-frequency daily data on tourism.

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File URL: http://www.hced.uni-hamburg.de/WorkingPapers/HCED-037.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Chair for Economic Policy, University of Hamburg in its series Working Papers with number 037.

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Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: 15 Aug 2010
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Hamburg Contemporary Economic Discussions, Issue 37, 2010
Handle: RePEc:hce:wpaper:037

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Related research

Keywords: FIFA World Cup; Mega sporting events; Sport economics; Tourism; South Africa 2010; Self-defeating prophecies; Awareness; Google; Facebook; Social networks;

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Cited by:
  1. Michiel de Nooij & Marcel van den Berg, 2013. "The bidding paradox: why rational politicians still want to bid for mega sports events," Working Papers 13-08, Utrecht School of Economics.

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