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Migrations et discriminations professionnelles dans la province du Guangdong

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Author Info

  • Cécile Batisse

    (CERDI - Centre d'études et de recherches sur le developpement international - CNRS : UMR6587 - Université d'Auvergne - Clermont-Ferrand I)

  • Nong Zhu

    (INRS-UCS - INRS-UCS - Université du Québec à Montréal)

Abstract

Cet article étudie l'insertion de ces migrants ruraux sur le marché du travail de la province du Guangdong à partir d'une base de données originales issues d'une enquête sur les paysans-ouvriers (ming gong), réalisée en 2006. A partir de modèles de durée, nous portons une attention particulière aux caractéristiques individuelles, temporelles (évolution de la mobilité dans l'emploi au cours du temps) et spatiales (rôle du lieu d'origine). Nos résultats montrent que les migrants forment un groupe hétérogène du point de vue de leurs caractéristiques individuelles et de leur employabilité dans le delta de la rivière des Perles. L'insertion sur le marché du travail des femmes, des jeunes et des peu qualifiés est facilitée. La proximité géographique du lieu de départ de la migration est également favorable. Nous examinons enfin les déterminants du salaire urbain des paysans-ouvriers qui s'insèrent sur un marché du travail de plus en plus segmenté et fragmenté. / The integration of rural migrants into the urban labor market has become an essential economic issue in today's China. In the context of economic reforms, policies affecting migration in continental China have been redefined, which therefore greatly intensified the internal migration flows. Since the 1980s, the rural depopulation has been essentially linked to the migration of "peasant-workers" (ming gong) who continue to play a key role in the country's transition into a market economy. In this article, we study the integration of these rural migrants into the labor market in the Guangdong province using the original data from a 2006 survey of peasant-workers. Based on duration models estimation, the analysis focuses on the role of different characteristics: personal, temporal (i.e. the course of employment mobility through time) and spatial (i.e. the role of place of origin). Results show that migrants form a heterogeneous group in terms of personal characteristics and employability in the Pearl River delta. Women, the youth and the less qualified are among the advantaged. Geographical proximity also plays a favorable role. Finally, we examine the determinants of the wage in urban areas for peasant-workers who integrated the increasingly segmented and fragmented labor market.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HAL in its series Working Papers with number halshs-00578075.

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Date of creation: 18 Mar 2011
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Handle: RePEc:hal:wpaper:halshs-00578075

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Keywords: paysans-ouvriers; migration; emploi; villes; Chine / peasant workers; urban employment; wages; China;

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References

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  1. Z Ma, 1999. "Temporary migration and regional development in China," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 31(5), pages 783-802, May.
  2. Ingrid Nielsen & Chris Nyland & Russell Smyth & Minqiong Zhang, 2007. "Migration and the Right to Social Security: Perceptions of Off-farm Migrants' Rights to Social Insurance in China's Jiangsu Province," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 15(2), pages 29-43.
  3. John Knight & Lina Song & Jia Huaibin, 1999. "Chinese rural migrants in urban enterprises: Three perspectives," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 73-104.
  4. Xuejin Zuo & Feng Wang, 1999. "Inside China's Cities: Institutional Barriers and Opportunities for Urban Migrants," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(2), pages 276-280, May.
  5. Biliang Hu, 2008. "People's Mobility and "Guanxi" Networks: A Case Study," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 16(5), pages 103-117.
  6. Zhong Zhao, 2005. "Migration, Labor Market Flexibility, and Wage Determination in China: A Review," Labor and Demography 0507009, EconWPA.
  7. Meng, Xin & Zhang, Junsen, 2001. "The Two-Tier Labor Market in Urban China: Occupational Segregation and Wage Differentials between Urban Residents and Rural Migrants in Shanghai," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 485-504, September.
  8. Yu Chen, 2011. "Occupational Attainment of Migrants and Local Workers: Findings from a Survey in Shanghai's Manufacturing Sector," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 48(1), pages 3-21, January.
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