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Limited Partnership: Business, Government, Civil Society (NGOs) and the Public in the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI)

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  • Susan Ariel Aaronson

    ()
    (Department of Economics/Institute for International Economic Policy, George Washington University)

  • Jennifer Brinkerhoff

    ()
    (Department of Economics/Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University)

Abstract

This article examines the context and impact of the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative (EITI). I hyppothesize that EITI is not as effective as it could be because the governments, firms, and NGOs involved in EITI have very different visions of EITI. In EITI, firms are supposed to publish what they pay to extract resources, governments publish what they earn, and a multistakeholder group monitors and attempts to see if these figures can be reconciled. The group is supposed to push for the government to find this balance. Some governments have not allowed civil society to fully participate in the EITI process. In that regard it is a limited partnership. Civil society,as representatives of the public, can not act as an anticorruption counterweight.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy in its series Working Papers with number 2010-28.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2009
Date of revision:
Publication status: Forthcoming in Public Administration and Development
Handle: RePEc:gwi:wpaper:2010-28

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Related research

Keywords: oil; minerals; resource curse; corruption; governance;

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References

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  1. Sachs, J-D & Warner, A-M, 1995. "Natural Resource Abundance and Economic Growth," Papers 517a, Harvard - Institute for International Development.
  2. Sandholtz, Wayne & Gray, Mark M., 2003. "International Integration and National Corruption," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(04), pages 761-800, September.
  3. Brunetti, Aymo & Weder, Beatrice, 2003. "A free press is bad news for corruption," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(7-8), pages 1801-1824, August.
  4. Reinikka, Ritva & Svensson, Jakob, 2004. "The power of information : evidence from a newspaper campaign to reduce capture," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3239, The World Bank.
  5. Keohane, Robert O, 2002. "Rational Choice Theory and International Law: Insights and Limitations," The Journal of Legal Studies, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages S307-19, January.
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Cited by:
  1. LĂ©once Ndikumana, 2013. "The Private Sector as Culprit and Victim of Corruption in Africa," Working Papers wp330, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

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