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The Institutional Economics of Corruption and Reform

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  • Lambsdorff,Johann Graf
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    Abstract

    Corruption has been a feature of public institutions for centuries yet only relatively recently has it been made the subject of sustained scientific analysis. Lambsdorff shows how insights from institutional economics can be used to develop a better understanding of why corruption occurs and the best policies to combat it. He argues that rather than being deterred by penalties, corrupt actors are more influenced by other factors such as the opportunism of their criminal counterparts and the danger of acquiring an unreliable reputation. This suggests a novel strategy for fighting corruption similar to the invisible hand that governs competitive markets. This strategy - the 'invisible foot' - shows that the unreliability of corrupt counterparts induces honesty and good governance even in the absence of good intentions. Combining theoretical research with state-of-the-art empirical investigations, this book will be an invaluable resource for researchers and policy-makers concerned with anti-corruption reform.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by Cambridge University Press in its series Cambridge Books with number 9780521872751 and published in 2007.

    Order: http://www.cambridge.org/uk/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=9780521872751
    Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521872751

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    Web page: http://www.cambridge.org

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    Cited by:
    1. Laurent Weill, 2009. "Does Corruption Hamper Bank Lending? Macro and Micro Evidence," Working Papers of LaRGE Research Center 2009-09, Laboratoire de Recherche en Gestion et Economie (LaRGE), Université de Strasbourg (France).
    2. Erich Gundlach & Martin Paldam, 2008. "The Transition of Corruption: From Poverty to Honesty," Kiel Working Papers 1411, Kiel Institute for the World Economy.
    3. Christopher Baughn & Nancy Bodie & Mark Buchanan & Michael Bixby, 2010. "Bribery in International Business Transactions," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 15-32, March.
    4. Luca Pieroni & Giorgio D'Agostino, 2011. "Corruption and the effects of economic freedom," Departmental Working Papers of Economics - University 'Roma Tre' 0133, Department of Economics - University Roma Tre.
    5. Hasim Akça & Ahmet Yilmaz Ata & Coskun Karaca, 2012. "Inflation and Corruption Relationship: Evidence from Panel Data in Developed and Developing Countries," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 2(3), pages 281-295.
    6. Anja Rohwer, 2009. "Measuring Corruption: A Comparison between the Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index and the World Bank's Worldwide Governance Indicators," CESifo DICE Report, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 7(3), pages 42-52, October.
    7. Lambert-Mogiliansky, Ariane & Majumdar, Mukul & Radner, Roy, 2008. "Strategic Analysis of Petty Corruption with an Intermediary," Working Papers 08-11, Cornell University, Center for Analytic Economics.
    8. Frédéric Boehm & Johann Graf Lambsdorff, 2009. "Corrupción y anticorrupción: una perspectiva neo-institucional," Revista de Economía Institucional, Universidad Externado de Colombia - Facultad de Economía, vol. 11(21), pages 45-72, July-Dece.
    9. Patrawart, Kraiyos, 2008. "Can Equality in Education Be A New Anti-Corruption Tool?: Cross-Country Evidence (1990-2005)," MPRA Paper 9665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Onyeka Osuji, 2011. "Fluidity of Regulation-CSR Nexus: The Multinational Corporate Corruption Example," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 103(1), pages 31-57, September.
    11. Biswas, Amit K. & Farzanegan, Mohammad Reza & Thum, Marcel, 2012. "Pollution, shadow economy and corruption: Theory and evidence," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 114-125.
    12. James P. Gander, 2013. "A Dynamic Managerial Theory of Corruption and Productivity Among Firms in Developing Countries," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2013_10, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    13. Youssef, Carolyn M. & Luthans, Fred, 2012. "Positive global leadership," Journal of World Business, Elsevier, vol. 47(4), pages 539-547.

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