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Missing Women: Some Recent Controversies on Levels and Trends in Gender Bias in Mortality

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  • Stephan Klasen

    ()
    (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen / Germany)

Abstract

This paper discusses two recent controversies surrounding levels and trends in the number of ‘missing women’ in the world. First, the impact of fertility decline on gender bias in mortality is examined. Contrary to the expectations of some authors, fertility decline has not generally led to an intensification of gender bias in mortality. Second, the paper finds that the claim that a substantial portion of ‘missing women’ is due to higher sex ratios at birth linked to hepatitis B prevalence in the affected regions is on rather weak foundations, while there is substantial evidence countering this claim.

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File URL: http://wwwuser.gwdg.de/~fjohann/paper/DB168.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Ibero-America Institute for Economic Research in its series Ibero America Institute for Econ. Research (IAI) Discussion Papers with number 168.

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Length: 17 pages
Date of creation: 15 Jan 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:got:iaidps:168

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Related research

Keywords: Missing women; fertility decline; Hepatitis B; sex-selective abortions; gender bias in mortality;

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References

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  1. P. Bhat & A. Zavier, 2003. "Fertility decline and gender bias in," Demography, Springer, vol. 40(4), pages 637-657, November.
  2. Dejian Lai, 2005. "Sex Ratio at Birth and Infant Mortality Rate in China: An Empirical Study," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 70(3), pages 313-326, 02.
  3. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2002. "A Turning Point in Gender Bias in Mortality? An Update on the Number of Missing Women," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 28(2), pages 285-312.
  4. Monica Das Gupta, 2006. "Cultural versus Biological Factors in Explaining Asia's "Missing Women": Response to Oster," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 32(2), pages 328-332.
  5. Monica Das Gupta, 2005. "Explaining Asia's "Missing Women": A New Look at the Data," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 31(3), pages 529-535.
  6. Stephan Klasen & Claudia Wink, 2003. ""Missing Women": Revisiting The Debate," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(2-3), pages 263-299.
  7. Jean Drèze & Mamta Murthi, 2001. "Fertility, Education, and Development: Evidence from India," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 27(1), pages 33-63.
  8. Ming-Jen Lin & Ming-Ching Luoh, 2008. "Can Hepatitis B Mothers Account for the Number of Missing Women? Evidence from Three Million Newborns in Taiwan," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 98(5), pages 2259-73, December.
  9. Klasen, Stephan, 1994. ""Missing women" reconsidered," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(7), pages 1061-1071, July.
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