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Benefits trickling away: The health impact of extending access to piped water and sanitation in urban Yemen

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  • Stephan Klasen

    (Georg-August-University Göttingen)

  • Tobias Lechtenfeld

    (Georg-August-University Göttingen)

  • Kristina Meier

    (Georg-August-University Göttingen)

  • Johannes Rieckmann

    (Georg-August-University Göttingen)

Abstract

This article investigates the impact of piped water supply and sanitation on health outcomes in urban Yemen using a combination of quasi-experimental methods and results from microbiological water tests. Variations in project roll-out allow separate identification of water and sanitation impacts. Results indicate that access to piped water supply worsens health outcomes when water rationing is frequent, which appears to be linked to a build-up of pollution in the network. When water supply is continuous no clear health benefits are found compared to traditional urban water supply through water vendors. Connections to piped sewers can lead to health improvements, conditional on regular water supply. The findings suggest that investments in piped water supply should not be made when availability and reliability of water cannot be guaranteed.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Courant Research Centre PEG in its series Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers with number 110.

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Date of creation: 01 Mar 2012
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Handle: RePEc:got:gotcrc:110

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Related research

Keywords: water supply; water quality; sanitation; hygiene; child health; diarrhoea; impact evaluation; infrastructure; Yemen;

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  1. Victoria Yue-May Fan & Ajay Mahal, 2011. "What prevents child diarrhoea? The impacts of water supply, toilets, and hand-washing in rural India," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 340-370, September.
  2. Michael Kremer & Edward Miguel, 2007. "The Illusion of Sustainability," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 122(3), pages 1007-1065, 08.
  3. World Bank, 2004. "Water Resources Sector Strategy : Strategic Directions for World Bank Engagement," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15013, October.
  4. Shanti Gamper-Rabindran & Shakeeb Khan & Christopher Timmins, 2010. "The Impact of Piped Water Provision on Infant Mortality in Brazil: A Quantile Panel Data Approach," Working Papers 10-04, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  5. Jalan, Jyotsna & Ravallion, Martin, 2003. "Does piped water reduce diarrhea for children in rural India?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 153-173, January.
  6. Sebastian Galiani & Paul Gertler & Ernesto Schargrodsky, 2005. "Water for Life: The Impact of the Privatization of Water Services on Child Mortality," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(1), pages 83-120, February.
  7. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, 01.
  8. Ganesh Rauniyar & Aniceto Orbeta & Guntur Sugiyarto, 2011. "Impact of water supply and sanitation assistance on human welfare in rural Pakistan," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 62-102.
  9. Gamper-Rabindran, Shanti & Khan, Shakeeb & Timmins, Christopher, 2010. "The impact of piped water provision on infant mortality in Brazil: A quantile panel data approach," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(2), pages 188-200, July.
  10. Wendy Janssens, 2011. "Externalities In Program Evaluation: The Impact Of A Women'S Empowerment Program On Immunization," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 9(6), pages 1082-1113, December.
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