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The Determinants of Child Labour and Child Schooling in Ghana

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  • Ray, R.

Abstract

This paper investigates the main determinants of child labour and child schooling in Ghana, with special reference to the interaction between child labour and adult labour markets. This paper proposes a test of the link between household poverty and child labour hours, and provides Ghanian evidence.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Tasmania - Department of Economics in its series Papers with number 2000-5.

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Length: 21 pages
Date of creation: 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:tasman:2000-5

Contact details of provider:
Postal: UNIVERSITY OF TASMANIA, DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS, HOBART TASMANIA 7001 AUSTRALIA.
Phone: +61 3 6226 7672
Fax: +61 3 6226 7587
Web page: http://www.utas.edu.au/economics-finance/
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Related research

Keywords: CHILDREN ; EDUCATION;

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Cited by:
  1. Francesca Marchetta & David Sahn, 2012. "The role of education and family background in marriage, childbearing and labor market participation in Senegal," Working Papers halshs-00717813, HAL.
  2. Geoffrey Lancaster & Ranjan Ray, 2004. "Does Child Labour Affect School Attendance and School Performance?Multi Country Evidence on SIMPOC data," Econometric Society 2004 Australasian Meetings 68, Econometric Society.
  3. Leonardo Becchetti & Stefano Castriota & Nazaria Solferino, 2011. "Development Projects and Life Satisfaction: An Impact Study on Fair Trade Handicraft Producers," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 115-138, March.
  4. Saqib Jafarey & Sajal Lahiri, 1999. "Will trade sanctions reduce child labour? The role of credit markets," Economics Discussion Papers 500, University of Essex, Department of Economics.
  5. Heather Congdon Fors, 2012. "Child Labour: A Review Of Recent Theory And Evidence With Policy Implications," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(4), pages 570-593, 09.
  6. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
  7. Shunsuke Sakamoto, 2006. "Parental Attitudes toward Children and Child Labor: Evidence from Rural India," Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series d05-136, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Krauss, Alexander, 2013. "Understanding child labor in Ghana beyond poverty -- the structure of the economy, social norms, and no returns to rural basic education," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6513, The World Bank.
  9. Maldonado, Jorge H. & González-Vega, Claudio, 2008. "Impact of Microfinance on Schooling: Evidence from Poor Rural Households in Bolivia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2440-2455, November.
  10. Yohanne Kidolezi & Jessica Holmes & Hugo Ñopo & Paul Sommers, 2007. "Selection and Reporting Bias in Household Surveys of Child Labor: Evidence from Tanzania," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 19(2), pages 368-378.
  11. Bluffstone, Randall & Yesuf, Mahmud & Bushie, Bilisuma & Damite, Demessie, 2008. "Rural Livelihoods, Poverty, and the Millennium Development Goals: Evidence from Ethiopian Survey Data," Discussion Papers dp-08-07-efd, Resources For the Future.
  12. Saswati Das & Diganta Mukherjee, 2007. "Role of women in schooling and child labour decision: the case of urban boys in India," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 82(3), pages 463-486, July.
  13. Diganta Mukherjee & Saswati Das, 2008. "Role of Parental Education in Schooling and Child Labour Decision: Urban India in the Last Decade," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 89(2), pages 305-322, November.
  14. Runa Ray & Biswajit Chatterjee, 2010. "Impact of Restrictive Trade Policy on Adult Unemployment, Welfare and the Incidence of Child Labour -A Three Sector General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Quantitative Economics, The Indian Econometric Society, vol. 8(1), pages 148-161, January.
  15. Eugenia Fotoniata & Thomas Moutos, 2013. "Product Quality, Informality, and Child Labor," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(2), pages 268-283, 05.
  16. Mukherjee, Dipa, 2010. "Child workers in India: an overview of macro dimensions," MPRA Paper 35049, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2011.
  17. Hilson, Gavin, 2012. "Family Hardship and Cultural Values: Child Labor in Malian Small-Scale Gold Mining Communities," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1663-1674.

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