Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Youth, Adolescence, and Maturity of Banks: Credit Availability to Small Business in an Era of Banking Consolidation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Robert DeYoung
  • Lawrence G. Goldberg
  • Lawrence J. White

Abstract

This paper addresses the relationship between the aging process at new and relatively young banks and the tendency of banks to make loans to small businesses. Defining small business loans as C&I loans that are under $1 million in size, we analyze a sample of banks that had assets of less than $500 million in assets for the years 1993-1996 and that were 25 years of age or younger. We find, as have earlier studies, that banks' proclivities for small business lending are negatively related to their age and to their size. We proceed much farther, however, by introducing a number of additional explanatory variables. We find that small business lending is negatively related to the number of a bank's branches, to its recent growth rate, and to a bank's being part of a MBHC. Also, small business lending is positively related to higher concentration rates in urban areas but is negatively related to higher concentration in rural areas. Despite the inclusion of these additional variables, the negative effects of a bank's age on its small business lending persist, albeit with reduced magnitudes. We also examine sub-samples of our data. When only "young" banks (ten years old or less) are considered, the inclusion of the additional variables causes the effects of age to disappear for freestanding (independent and OBHC) banks; and when only MBHC banks are considered, age disappears as a significant influence.

Download Info

To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
1. Check below under "Related research" whether another version of this item is available online.
2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business- in its series New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires with number 98-025.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 10 Oct 1997
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fth:nystfi:98-025

Contact details of provider:
Postal: U.S.A.; New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business, Department of Economics . 44 West 4th Street. New York, New York 10012-1126
Phone: (212) 998-0100
Web page: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/finance/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Allen N. Berger & Anthony Saunders & Joseph M. Scalise & Gregory F. Udell, 1997. "The effects of bank mergers and acquisitions on small business lending," Proceedings 549, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  2. Mark E. Levonian, 1996. "Explaining differences in farm lending among banks," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, pages 12-22.
  3. Lawrence G. Goldberg & Lawrence J. White, 1997. "De Novo Banks and Lending to Small Businesses: An Empirical Analysis," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 98-039, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
  4. Allen N. Berger & Anil K. Kashyap & Joseph Scalise, 1995. "The Transformation of the U.S. Banking Industry: What a Long, Strange Trip It's Been," Center for Financial Institutions Working Papers 96-06, Wharton School Center for Financial Institutions, University of Pennsylvania.
  5. Philip E. Strahan & James Weston, 1996. "Small business lending and bank consolidation: is there cause for concern?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 2(Mar).
  6. William C. Hunter & Aruna Srinivasan, 1990. "Determinants of de novo bank performance," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, issue Mar, pages 14-25.
  7. Petersen, Mitchell A & Rajan, Raghuram G, 1994. " The Benefits of Lending Relationships: Evidence from Small Business Data," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 49(1), pages 3-37, March.
  8. Saxonhouse, Gary R, 1976. "Estimated Parameters as Dependent Variables," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 66(1), pages 178-83, March.
  9. DeYoung, Robert & Hasan, Iftekhar, 1998. "The performance of de novo commercial banks: A profit efficiency approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 565-587, May.
  10. Hannan, Timothy H., 1991. "Bank commercial loan markets and the role of market structure: evidence from surveys of commercial lending," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 133-149, February.
  11. William R. Keeton, 1995. "Multi-office bank lending to small businesses: some new evidence," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q II, pages 45-57.
  12. Strahan, Philip E. & Weston, James P., 1998. "Small business lending and the changing structure of the banking industry1," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(6-8), pages 821-845, August.
  13. Mitchell A. Petersen & Raghuram G. Rajan, 1994. "The Effect of Credit Market Competition on Lending Relationships," NBER Working Papers 4921, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Rebel A. Cole & Lawrence G. Goldberg & Lawrence J. White, 1999. "Cookie-cutter versus character: the micro structure of small business lending by large and small banks," Proceedings 777, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.
  15. Arshadi, Nasser & Lawrence, Edward C., 1987. "An empirical investigation of new bank performance," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 11(1), pages 33-48, March.
  16. Lang, William W & Nakamura, Leonard I, 1989. " Information Losses in a Dynamic Model of Credit," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 44(3), pages 730-46, July.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:nystfi:98-025. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.