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Eventually, noise and imitation implies balanced growth

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  • Erzo G.J. Luttmer

Abstract

This paper adds imitation by incumbent firms, and not just by new entrants, to the model of selection and growth developed in Luttmer [2007]. Noisy firm-level innovation and imitation give rise to a long-run growth rate that exceeds the average rate at which individual firms innovate. It can be shown, in simple examples, that the economy converges to a long-run balanced growth path from compactly supported initial productivity distributions. The right tail of the stationary distribution of de-trended productivity is approximately Pareto. The tail index of this distribution depends on the rate at which incumbents are able to imitate only indirectly, through general equilibrium effects of this parameter on the equilibrium growth rate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis in its series Working Papers with number 699.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedmwp:699

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  1. Michael Koenig & Jan Lorenz & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2012. "Innovation vs. Imitation and the Evolution of Productivity Distributions," Discussion Papers 11-008, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  2. Jesse Perla & Christopher Tonetti, 2014. "Equilibrium Imitation and Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 122(1), pages 52 - 76.
  3. Satyajit Chatterjee & Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 2008. "Spinoffs and the market for ideas," Working Papers 08-26, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  4. Robert E. Lucas, Jr. & Benjamin Moll, 2011. "Knowledge Growth and the Allocation of Time," NBER Working Papers 17495, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Fernando E. Alvarez & Francisco J. Buera & Robert E. Lucas, Jr., 2008. "Models of Idea Flows," NBER Working Papers 14135, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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