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Household structure in the EU

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Author Info

  • Iacovou, Maria
  • Skew, Alexandra J.

Abstract

This paper maps key indicators of household structure across all countries for all countries of the expanded European Union except Malta. As well as presenting statistics which take the entire household as the unit of analysis, we also focus on groups which are particularly interesting in terms of social policy, and for whom household composition may be particularly crucial in terms of their risk of poverty: children, young adults and elderly people. A main aim of the paper is to discuss the extent to which the new EU member states of Eastern Europe display differences and similarities with the other countries of the EU. We find that the Eastern European countries are rather heterogeneous. The Czech Republic and Hungary are not dissimilar to the countries of North-Western Europe; by contrast, households in Slovenia, Slovakia and Poland closely resemble Southern European households. Finally, it is the Baltic states particularly Latvia where household structure least resembles structures in any of the pre-enlargement EU countries.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2010-10.

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Date of creation: 19 Apr 2010
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-10

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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References

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  1. Marco Manacorda & Enrico Moretti, 2006. "Why do Most Italian Youths Live with Their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 4(4), pages 800-829, 06.
  2. Alessandro Rosina & Romina Fraboni, 2004. "Is marriage losing its centrality in Italy?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 11(6), pages 149-172, September.
  3. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  4. Rendall, Michael S & Speare, Alden, Jr, 1995. "Elderly Poverty Alleviation through Living with Family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 383-405, November.
  5. Scott Boggess, 1998. "Family structure, economic status, and educational attainment," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 205-222.
  6. Tineke Fokkema & Aart C. Liefbroer, 2008. "Trends in living arrangements in Europe: Convergence or divergence?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(36), pages 1351-1418, July.
  7. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-24 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2012. "Political Socialization in Flux? Linking Family Non-Intactness during Childhood to Adult Civic Engagement," CESifo Working Paper Series 3918, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Maria Iacovou & Alexandra J. Skew, 2011. "Household composition across the new Europe: Where do the new Member States fit in?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 25(14), pages 465-490, August.
  3. Timo Hener & Helmut Rainer & Thomas Siedler, 2013. "Political Socialization in Flux?: Linking Family Non-Intactness during Childhood to Adult Civic Engagement," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 612, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  4. Anna Baranowska, 2011. "Trash contracts? The impact of temporary employment on leaving the parental home in Poland," Working Papers 44, Institute of Statistics and Demography, Warsaw School of Economics.

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