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Regional GDP in Britain, 1871-1911: some estimates

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  • Nicholas Crafts

Abstract

The paper builds on a method proposed by Geary and Stark (2002) for estimating regional incomes in Victorian Britain. This is modified by using tax data to allocate non-wage income across regions. The results suggest that the coefficient of variation of regional GDP per head was rising rapidly prior to World War I in similar fashion to the late twentieth century such that its level in 1911 and 2001 was about the same. In both episodes of globalization there were big winners and big losers among British regions.

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File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/22557/
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History in its series Economic History Working Papers with number 22557.

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Length: 19 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ehl:wpaper:22557

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Postal: LSE, Dept. of Economic History Houghton Street London, WC2A 2AE, U.K.
Phone: +44 (0) 20 7955 7084
Web page: http://www.lse.ac.uk/economicHistory/
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Cited by:
  1. Leunig, Timothy, 2006. "Time is Money: A Re-Assessment of the Passenger Social Savings from Victorian British Railways," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 66(03), pages 635-673, September.
  2. Martin Eriksson, 2011. "The Challenges of Including Political Economy Research in Regional Economic History," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1642, European Regional Science Association.
  3. Kerstin Enflo & Joan R. Rosés, 2012. "Coping with regional inequality in Sweden : structural change, migrations and policy, 1860-2000," Working Papers in Economic History wp12-09, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  4. Julio Martínez-Galarraga, 2014. "Market potential estimates in history: a survey of methods and an application to Spain, 1867-1930," Working Papers 0051, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  5. Jean-Pascal Bassino & Kyoji Fukao & Ralph Paprzycki & Tokihiko Settsu & Tangjun Yuan, 2010. "Regional Inequality and Industrial Structures in Pre-War Japan: An Analysis Based on New Prefectural GDP Estimates," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd10-138, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  6. Carlo Ciccarelli & Anna Missiaia, 2014. "Business Fluctuations in Imperial Austria's Regions, 1867-1913: New Evidence," CEIS Research Paper 312, Tor Vergata University, CEIS, revised 11 Apr 2014.
  7. Emanuele Felice, 2011. "The Rule and the Exception: Italy’s Regional Imbalances (1891-2001) through a Shift-Share Analysis," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 4, December.
  8. Emanuele Felice & Giovanni Vecchi, 2012. "Italy’s Modern Economic Growth, 1861-2011," Department of Economics University of Siena 663, Department of Economics, University of Siena.
  9. Markus Lampe & Paul Sharp, 2013. "Greasing the Wheels of Rural Transformation? Margarine and the Competition for the British Butter Market," Working Papers 0043, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
  10. Max-Stephan Schulze, 2007. "Regional income dispersion and market potential in the late nineteenth century Hapsburg Empire," Economic History Working Papers 22311, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.

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  1. Historical Economic Geography

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