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Does anybody give a dam? The importance of public awareness for urban water conservation during drought

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  • Emma Aisbett

    ()
    (Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University)

  • Ralf Steinhauser

    ()
    (ANU College of Business and Economics , The Australian National University)

Abstract

Demand management has been of interest in dry climates such as Australia, Spain and the Western United States for decades. It is particularly important to understand policy options during drought conditions, as drought periods have a disproportionate effect on supply infrastructure decisions. While water‐conservation campaigns aimed at inducing voluntary consumption reductions are almost universally employed by water managers in times of supply constraint, voluntary measures are generally dismissed in the economics literature as ineffective. We argue that the robust positive correlation between dam levels and consumption after controlling for policy changes suggests that there is a significant component of voluntary conservation. Furthermore, omitting dam levels from regressions may bias estimated impacts of policy changes

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Paper provided by Environmental Economics Research Hub, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University in its series Environmental Economics Research Hub Research Reports with number 10100.

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Date of creation: Mar 2011
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Handle: RePEc:een:eenhrr:10100

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  1. R. Quentin Grafton & Tom Kompas & Hang To & Michael Ward, 2009. "Residential Water Consumption: A Cross Country Analysis," Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy Papers 0901, Centre for Water Economics, Environment and Policy, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
  2. Sheila Olmstead & W. Michael Hanemann & Robert N. Stavins, 2007. "Water Demand Under Alternative Price Structures," NBER Working Papers 13573, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. R. Quentin Grafton & Michael B. Ward, 2008. "Prices versus Rationing: Marshallian Surplus and Mandatory Water Restrictions," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 84(s1), pages S57-S65, 09.
  4. R. Quentin Grafton & Tom Kompas, 2007. "Pricing Sydney water ," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 51(3), pages 227-241, 09.
  5. Renwick, Mary E. & Green, Richard D., 2000. "Do Residential Water Demand Side Management Policies Measure Up? An Analysis of Eight California Water Agencies," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 37-55, July.
  6. Jasper M. Dalhuisen & Raymond J. G. M. Florax & JHenri L. F. de Groot & Peter Nijkamp, 2003. "Price and Income Elasticities of Residential Water Demand: A Meta-Analysis," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 79(2), pages 292-308.
  7. Patrick Troy & Darren Holloway, 2004. "The use of residential water consumption as an urban planning tool: a pilot study in Adelaide," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(1), pages 97-114.
  8. Mary E. Renwick & Sandra O. Archibald, 1998. "Demand Side Management Policies for Residential Water Use: Who Bears the Conservation Burden?," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 74(3), pages 343-359.
  9. R. G. Taylor & John R. McKean & Robert A. Young, 2004. "Alternate Price Specifications for Estimating Residential Water Demand with Fixed Fees," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 80(3), pages 463-475.
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Cited by:
  1. Emma Aisbett & Ralf Steinhauser, 2011. "Maintaining the Common Pool: Voluntary Water Conservation in Response to Increasing Scarcity," Crawford School Research Papers 1111, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.

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