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Smooth Transition Regression Models in UK Stock Returns

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Author Info

  • Aslanidis, Nektarios

    (University of Manchester)

  • Denise R. Osborn
  • Marianne Sensier

Abstract

This paper models UK stock market returns in a smooth transition regression (STR) framework. We employ a variety of financial and macroeconomic series that are assumed to influence UK stock returns, namely GDP, interest rates, inflation, money supply and US stock prices. We estimate STR models where the linearity hypothesis is strongly rejected for at least one transition variable. These non-linear models describe the in-sample movements of the stock returns series better than the corresponding linear model. Moreover, the US stock market appears to play an important role in determining the UK stock market returns regime.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Royal Economic Society in its series Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 with number 11.

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Date of creation: 29 Aug 2002
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Handle: RePEc:ecj:ac2002:11

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Web page: http://www.res.org.uk/society/annualconf.asp
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Cited by:
  1. Kulaksizoglu, Tamer & Kulaksizoglu, Sebnem, 2009. "The U.S. Excess Money Growth and Inflation Relation in the Long-Run: A Nonlinear Analysis," MPRA Paper 23780, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Neil Kellard & John Nankervis & Fotis Papadimitriou, 2007. "Predicting the UK Equity Premium with Dividend Ratios: An Out-Of-Sample Recursive Residuals Graphical Approach," Money Macro and Finance (MMF) Research Group Conference 2006 129, Money Macro and Finance Research Group.
  3. Alenka Kavkler & Mejra Festić, 2011. "Modelling Stock Exchange Index Returns in Different GDP Growth Regimes," Prague Economic Papers, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(1), pages 3-22.
  4. Giorgio Valente & Lucio Sarno, 2005. "Modelling and forecasting stock returns: exploiting the futures market, regime shifts and international spillovers," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(3), pages 345-376.

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