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Are promises indebting? Political economy of electoral promises

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  • Etienne Farvaque
  • Gaël Lagadec

Abstract

This article exposes the dynamics of electoral promises, building on an electoral competition model with endogenous policies. This framework allows to deal with the intertemporal dimension needed to understand the prevalent cycle of promises, disappointment, new promises, new disappointment

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File URL: https://dipot.ulb.ac.be/dspace/bitstream/2013/54148/1/RePEc_dul_wpaper_08-14rs.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles in its series DULBEA Working Papers with number 08-14.RS.

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Length: 20 p.
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by:
Handle: RePEc:dul:wpaper:08-14rs

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Postal: CP135, 50, avenue F.D. Roosevelt, 1050 Bruxelles
Web page: http://difusion.ulb.ac.be
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Keywords: Lobbies; Promises; Elections; Electoral competition; Lies;

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