Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Patents, Innovation and Access to New Pharmaceuticals

Contents:

Author Info

  • Grabowski, Henry
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper considers the role of intellectual property rights in the development of and access to new pharmaceuticals. A number of studies have found patents are significantly more important to pharmaceutical firms in appropriating the benefits from innovation compared to other high tech industries. The reason for this is because the costs of drug innovation are very high while the costs of imitation are relatively low. Hence the industry is subject to significant free rider problems. The paper discusses the economics of the innovative process and considers how patent policies have evolved in response to these characteristics in several developed countries with research intensive drug firms. One area currently receiving policy attention is the effect of patents on the development of and access to new medicines in developing countries. The final section of the paper focuses on this issue and discusses the need for an orphan drug type program to stimulate more R&D on diseases specific to third world countries.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www.econ.duke.edu/Papers/Abstracts02/abstract.02.28.html
    File Function: main text
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Duke University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 02-28.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 2002
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:02-28

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Department of Economics Duke University 213 Social Sciences Building Box 90097 Durham, NC 27708-0097
    Phone: (919) 660-1800
    Fax: (919) 684-8974
    Web page: http://econ.duke.edu/

    Related research

    Keywords:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    No references listed on IDEAS
    You can help add them by filling out this form.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Kyle, Margaret K & McGahan, Anita M, 2011. "Investments in Pharmaceuticals Before and After TRIPS," CEPR Discussion Papers 8371, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Michel Dumont & Peter Willemé, 2013. "Working Paper 02-13 - Machines that go ‘ping’: medical technology and health expenditures in OECD countries," Working Papers 1302, Federal Planning Bureau, Belgium.
    3. Luiz Flavio Andrade, 2012. "Entry Time Effects and Follow-on Drugs Competition," Working Papers DT49, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Jun 2012.
    4. Alka Chadha & Åke Blomqvist, 2005. "Patent Races, “Me-Too” Drugs, and Generics: A Developing-World Perspective," Departmental Working Papers wp0513, National University of Singapore, Department of Economics.
    5. Langinier, Corinne, 2004. "Are Patents Strategic Barriers to Entry?," Staff General Research Papers 11482, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    6. Ants Kukrus & Raul Kartus, 2005. "Patent Protection of Pharmaceutical Products in the Globalising World Economy," Working Papers 136, Tallinn School of Economics and Business Administration, Tallinn University of Technology.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:duk:dukeec:02-28. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Department of Economics Webmaster).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.