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Paying for the liberal state: the rise of public finance in nineteenth century Europe

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  • Jose Luis Cardoso

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  • Pedro Lains

    ()

Abstract

Public finance is a major feature of the development of modern European societies, and it is at the heart of the definition of the nature of political regimes. Public finance is also a most relevant issue in the understanding of the constraints and possibilities of economic development. This paper is about the rise and development of taxation systems, expenditure programs, and dept regimes in Europe from the early nineteenth century to the beginning of World War I. Its main purpose is to describe and explain the process by which financial resources were raised and managed. We analyse nine countries or empires that are considered highly representative of the widest European experience on the matter and discuss whether there are any common patterns in the way the different European states responded to the need for raising additional resources to pay for the new tasks they were performing

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones in its series Working Papers in Economic History with number wp09-03.

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Date of creation: Jun 2009
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Handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:wp09-03

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Keywords: Nineteenth Century Europe; Governments; Public finances; Taxation;

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Cited by:
  1. Hantke, Max & Spoerer, Mark, 2010. "The imposed gift of Versailles: the fiscal effects of restricting the size of Germany’s armed forces, 1924–1929," MPRA Paper 20054, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Timothy Irwin, 2013. "Shining a Light on the Mysteries of State: The Origins of Fiscal Transparency in Western Europe," IMF Working Papers, International Monetary Fund 13/219, International Monetary Fund.
  3. Francisco Comín, 2012. "Default, rescheduling and inflation : debt crisis in Spain during the 19th and 20th centuries," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones wp12-06, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  4. Javier San-Julián-Arrupe, 2011. "Economic ideas and redistributive policy in the Spanish parliament: the 1900 debate on fiscal progressivity," Documentos de Trabajo (DT-AEHE), Asociación Española de Historia Económica 1102, Asociación Española de Historia Económica.

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