Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Income distribution in the Latin American Southern Cone during the first globalization boom, ca: 1870-1920

Contents:

Author Info

  • Luis Bertola

    ()

  • Cecilia Castelnovo

    ()

  • Javier Rodriguez

    ()

  • Henry Willebald

    ()

Abstract

Latin America is the most unequal region in the world and there is a lively debate concerning the explanations and timing of such high levels of income inequality. Latin America was also the region, not including European Offshoots, which experienced the most rapid growth during the first globalization boom. It can, therefore, be taken as an interesting case study for how globalization forces impinged on growth and income distribution in peripheral regions. This paper presents a first estimate of income inequality in the Southern Cone of South America (Brazil 1872 and 1920, Chile 1870 and 1920, Uruguay 1920) and some assumptions concerning Argentina (1870 and 1920), and Uruguay (1870). We find an increasing inequality trend between 1870 and 1920 which can be explained as a process of inequality both within individual countries and between countries. This trend is discussed along three lines: the relation between inequality and per capita income levels; the dynamics of the expansion to new areas, and movements of relative factor prices and of the terms of trade.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://e-archivo.uc3m.es/bitstream/10016/2500/1/wp_08-05.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones in its series Working Papers in Economic History with number wp08-05.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Apr 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:wp08-05

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Campus de Getafe, C/ Madrid, 126, 28903 GETAFE (MADRID)
Phone: +34-91 624 9599
Web page: http://www.uc3m.es/uc3m/dpto/HISEC/01presentacion.html
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Globalization; Growth; Income inequality; Latin American Southern Cone; Regional inequality; Terms of trade;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. John H. Coatsworth & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2002. "The Roots of Latin American Protectionism: Looking Before the Great Depression," NBER Working Papers 8999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Jeffrey G. Williamson & Branko Milanovic & Peter H. Lindert, 2008. "Measuring Ancient Inequality," Working Papers, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC) 08-06, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
  3. François Bourguignon & Christian Morrisson, 2001. "Inequality among World Citizens : 1820-1992," DELTA Working Papers, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure) 2001-18, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  4. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2007. "Lost decades? Independence and latin America’s falling behind, 1820-1870," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones wp07-18, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  5. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2002. "Reversal Of Fortune: Geography And Institutions In The Making Of The Modern World Income Distribution," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 117(4), pages 1231-1294, November.
  6. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2004. "Colonial Independence And Economic Backwardness In Latin America," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones wh046503, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  7. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James Robinson, 2004. "Institutions as the Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 10481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Bates, Robert H & Coatsworth, John H & Williamson, Jeffrey G, 2006. "Lost Decades: Lessons from Post-Independence Latin America for Today's Africa," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5932, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Luis Bertola, 2005. "A 50 años de la Curva de Kuznets: Crecimiento Económico y Distribución del Ingreso en Uruguay y otros Países de Nuevo Asentamiento desde 1870," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones dilf0504, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  10. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2001. "Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth-Century Atlantic Economy," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650592, December.
  11. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2005. "Growth, Inequality, And Poverty In Latin America: Historical Evidence, Controlled Conjectures," Working Papers in Economic History, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones wh054104, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Historia Económica e Instituciones.
  12. Sebastian Edwards & Gerardo Esquivel & Graciela Márquez, 2007. "The Decline of Latin American Economies: Growth, Institutions, and Crises," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number edwa04-1.
  13. Kenneth L. Sokoloff & Stanley L. Engerman, 2000. "Institutions, Factor Endowments, and Paths of Development in the New World," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 217-232, Summer.
  14. Leandro Prados de la Escosura, 2007. "When Did Latin America Fall Behind?," NBER Chapters, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, in: The Decline of Latin American Economies: Growth, Institutions, and Crises, pages 15-58 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jorge Álvarez, 2013. "The evolution of inequality in Australasia and the River Plate, 1870-1914," Documentos de trabajo 31, Programa de Historia Económica, FCS, Udelar.
  2. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2009. "History without evidence: Latin American inequality since 1491," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics 81, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  3. Henry Willebald, 2013. "Distributive patterns in settler economies: agrarian income inequality during the first globalization (1870-1913)," Documentos de Trabajo (working papers), Instituto de Economía - IECON 13-05, Instituto de Economía - IECON.
  4. Jan Luiten van Zanden & Joerg Baten & Peter Foldvari & Bas van Leeuwen, 2011. "The Changing Shape of Global Inequality - exploring a new dataset," Working Papers, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History 0001, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
  5. Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2009. "History without Evidence: Latin American Inequality since 1491," NBER Working Papers 14766, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

Lists

This item is featured on the following reading lists or Wikipedia pages:
  1. Talk:Southern Cone in Wikipedia English ne '')

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cte:whrepe:wp08-05. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: () The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask to update the entry or send us the correct address.

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.