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Military Spending and the Growth-Maximizing Allocation of Public Capital: A Cross-Country Empirical Analysis

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  • Pantelis Kalaitzidakis

    ()
    (Dept of Economics, University of Crete, Greece)

  • Vangelis Tzouvelekas

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Crete, Greece)

Abstract

In this paper drawing from the theoretical framework developed by Shieh et al., (2002), we present an endogenous growth model to empirical analyze the growth maximizing allocation of public capital among military spending and investment in infrastructure. Using this general model of public capital formation, we derive the growth-maximizing values of the shares of public capital allocated to it’s two different types, as well as the growth-maximizing tax rate (amount of total public capital as a share of GDP). Then we proceed with an empirical investigation of the theoretical implication of the model that both the effects of the shares of public capital and the tax rate on the long-run growth rate are non-linear, following an inverse U-shaped pattern. Using data of public investment in infrastructure and military capital formation, we investigate the long run relationship between economic growth and the allocation of public capital using panel cointegration analysis in a sample of 55 developed and developing countries. Our empirical results confirm the theoretical implications of the model for the majority of the countries in the sample. This finding is more consistent for the OECD countries although the same result can be drawn for a large part of the developing countries.

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File URL: http://economics.soc.uoc.gr/wpa/docs/JDEFeb2006.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Crete, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0722.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 29 May 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:crt:wpaper:0722

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Keywords: public capital; military spending; economic growth; panel unit root tests; panel cointegration;

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Cited by:
  1. Thibaut Dort & Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2013. "Does investment spur growth everywhere? Not where institutions are weak," Working Papers CEB 13-030, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
  2. Goodness C. Aye & Mehmet Balcilar & John P. Dunne & Rangan Gupta & Renee van Eyden, 2013. "Military Expenditure, Economic Growth and Structural Instability: A Case Study of South Africa," Working Papers 201344, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
  3. Alptekin, Aynur & Levine, Paul, 2012. "Military expenditure and economic growth: A meta-analysis," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 636-650.

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