Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

The Sydney Olympics, seven years on: an ex-post dynamic CGE assessment

Contents:

Author Info

  • James A Giesecke
  • John R Madden

Abstract

A recent development in ex-ante analysis of mega events is the use of computable general equilibrium (CGE) models. CGE models improve greatly on the input-output model, which they have largely displaced, since they incorporate fixed factors and substitution effects. However, like input-output, the method is still subject to the risk of over-optimistic estimation of benefits. We see three sources of such risk: (i) failure to treat public inputs as costs; (ii) elastic factor supply assumptions; and (iii) overestimation of foreign demand shocks via inclusion of "induced tourism" expenditure. In this paper, we undertake an ex-post analysis of the Olympics that addresses each of these risks. We handle the first two directly: public services used to support the Games (such as security services) are treated as Games-specific inputs, and we model the national labour market in full employment. For the third risk, we undertake an historical simulation to uncover the extent, if any, of induced tourism. We find no evidence of an induced tourism effect, and so exclude it from our analysis. With these assumptions, we find the Sydney Olympics generated a net consumption loss of approximately $2.1 billion.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.copsmodels.com/ftp/workpapr/g-168.pdf
File Function: Initial version, 2007-09
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.copsmodels.com/elecpapr/g-168.htm
File Function: Local abstract: may link to additional material.
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre in its series Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers with number g-168.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in 'Modelling the economic impacts of the Sydney Olympics in retrospect: Game over for the bonanza story?', Economic Papers, Vol. 30(2), June 2011, pp. 218-232.
Handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-168

Contact details of provider:
Postal: PO Box 14428, Melbourne, Victoria, 8001
Phone: 03 9919 1877
Web page: http://www.copsmodels.com/about.htm
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Olympics economic impact; major projects; regional dynamic CGE;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. S'HANNO DA FARE LE OLIMPIADI A ROMA NEL 2020?
    by Lawrence Bartolomucci in La Voce on 2012-01-31 12:00:00

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cop:wpaper:g-168. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mark Horridge).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.