Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Financial Development and Selection into Entrepreneurship: Evidence from Italy and US

Contents:

Author Info

  • M. Deidda

    ()

Abstract

The existence of capital market imperfections causes business investment decisions to be strongly dependent on households private wealth allocation. I claim that if a link exists between private wealth and business decisions, it should be stronger in countries with less developed capital markets. Here, I test this theoretical prediction assessing the relationship between initial household net wealth and the probability of switching to entrepreneurship in Italy and the United States, using household-level data from the Survey of Household Income and Wealth (SHIW) and the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics (PSID). Although Italy and the United States are both developed countries, there are striking differences between the two in terms of transaction costs, downpayment requirements and participation in financial markets. I formulated several theoretical predictions, which are then compared with the data at hand. First of all, I argue that initial wealth should matter more for potential Italian entrepreneurs, who may encounter greater difficulties than their US counterparts in obtaining sufficient funds from a bank or financial institution to start a business. From this perspective, "informal markets" (i.e. help from friends or relatives) should play a more significant role for potential entrepreneurs in Italy, especially for those who are more likely to be constrained. Secondly, I claim that a well developed financial market, by reducing household exposure to financial risk, would positively affect transition into entrepreneurship. Therefore, I fill a gap in the literature introducing a portfolio diversification index, calculated as the inverse of the Herfindhal index, in order to assess the level of financial sophistication. Last but not least, I simultaneously estimate the probability of switching to entrepreneurship and changes in net wealth. Using a sample selection model with endogenous switching makes it possible to deal with endogeneity issues, related to the fact that households may actually accumulate assets prior to setting up a business.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://crenos.unica.it/crenos/node/2664
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://crenos.unica.it/crenos/sites/all/modules/pubdlcnt/pubdlcnt.php?file=http://crenos.unica.it/crenos/sites/default/files/WP10-04.pdf&nid=2664
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia in its series Working Paper CRENoS with number 201004.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cns:cnscwp:201004

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Via S. Giorgio 12, I-09124 Cagliari
Phone: +70/6756406
Fax: +70/6756402
Email:
Web page: http://www.crenos.unica.it/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: entrepreneurship; business start up; financial development;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:cns:cnscwp:201004. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Antonello Pau).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.