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The Air Quality Impacts of Urban Highway Capacity Expansion: Traffic Generation and Land Use Change

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  • Hansen, Mark
  • Gillen, David
  • Dobbins, Allison
  • Huang, Yuanlin
  • Puvathingal, Mohnish
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    Abstract

    Since the mid-1970s, traffic congestion on California’s urban highways has increased markedly. The roughly 3 per cent annual growth in the ratio of vehicle-miles to lane-miles that occurred during the 1960s accelerated to 4 per cent from 1974 to 1985 and 5 per cent after 1985. Moreover, there was comparatively little upgrading of existing lane-miles over this period. As traffic density increased, so did congestion. By 1988, some estimates put the economic cost of congestion to California at $16 billion in time lost and $1 billion in fuel. Despite a California Division of Highways Plan, developed in 1958, calling for 12 thousand miles of limited access roadways, by 1990 less than 6 thousand had been completed.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of California Transportation Center in its series University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers with number qt6zz3k76c.

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    Date of creation: 01 Apr 1993
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    Handle: RePEc:cdl:uctcwp:qt6zz3k76c

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    Keywords: Social and Behavioral Sciences;

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    Cited by:
    1. Gilles Duranton & Matthew A. Turner, 2011. "The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2616-52, October.
    2. Johnston, Robert, 1997. "A Comparative Systems-level Analysis: Automated Freeways, Hov Lanes, Transit Expansion, Pricing Policies And Land Use Intensification," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley qt6mt9f54w, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    3. Cervero, Robert, 2001. "Induced Demand: An Urban Metropolitan Perspective," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers, University of California Transportation Center qt5pj337gw, University of California Transportation Center.
    4. Cervero, Robert, 2001. "Road Expansion, Urban Growth, and Induced Travel: A Path Analysis," University of California Transportation Center, Working Papers, University of California Transportation Center qt05x370hr, University of California Transportation Center.
    5. Patricia Mokhtarian & Francisco Samaniego & Robert Shumway & Neil Willits, 2002. "Revisiting the notion of induced traffic through a matched-pairs study," Transportation, Springer, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 193-220, May.
    6. Johnston, R. & Rodier, C., 1996. "Travel, Emissions, And Consumer Benefits Of Advanced Transit Technologies In The Sacramento Region," Institute of Transportation Studies, Research Reports, Working Papers, Proceedings, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley qt7qg4z0k2, Institute of Transportation Studies, UC Berkeley.
    7. Richard Voith, 1998. "Transportation investments in the Philadelphia metropolitan area: who benefits? Who pays? And what are the consequences?," Working Papers, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia 98-7, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

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