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Determinants of Fertiliser Use by Smallholder Maize Farmers in the Chinyanja Triangle in Malawi, Mozambique and Zambia

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Author Info

  • Mapila, Mariam A.T.J.
  • Njuki, Jemimah M.
  • Delve, Robert J.
  • Zingore, Shamie
  • Matibini, Josephine

Abstract

Farm surveys in Malawi, Zambia and Mozambique were carried out to assess the determinants of fertiliser use given continued low yields, low organic matter and general poor soil health in Southern African soils. Regression modelling showed that fertiliser use was influenced by household and farm characteristics. In addition, it was also influenced by social and human capital and farmers’ perceptions of the effect of fertilisers on soil fertility. Farmers who perceived fertilisers as bad for their soil were less likely to adopt their use. This is a key result, as the emerging discussions on a green revolution for Africa, as well as the continued food crisis discussion, are prompting increased fertiliser use as an immediate intervention for increasing nutrient inputs into agriculture in the developing world. Increased policy efforts should be placed not only on increasing access to fertilisers but also on evolving farmers’ perceptions and attitudes towards fertiliser use.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its series 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil with number 123354.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:ags:iaae12:123354

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Related research

Keywords: African green revolution; farmer perceptions; fertiliser subsidies; fertiliser use; human capital; social capital; Agricultural and Food Policy; Community/Rural/Urban Development;

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Cited by:
  1. Mkwara, Bentry, 2013. "To what extent do fertiliser subsidies improve household income and reduce poverty? The case of Malawi," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), October.
  2. Kamau, Mercy & Smale, Melinda & Mutua, Mercy, 2013. "Farmer Demand for Soil Fertility Management Practices in Kenya’s Grain Basket," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150722, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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