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Arms races and proliferation

In: Handbook of Defense Economics

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  • Brito, Dagobert L.
  • Intriligator, Michael D.
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    Abstract

    Previous analyses of arms races and proliferation are integrated and extended, building from a treatment of the behavioral foundations of weapons acquisitions to a general theory of arms races, with implications for the role of negotiations, the balance of power, the timing of crises, and nuclear proliferation. Recent developments in economic theory are also applied here to the problems of the arms race, nuclear proliferation, and the outbreak of war, yielding a deeper treatment of these phenomena by directly or indirectly treating asymmetric information in bargaining, repeated games that involve threats, and principal-agent problems in decisions on technology and weapons accumulation.

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    This chapter was published in:

  • Keith Hartley & Todd Sandler (ed.), 1995. "Handbook of Defense Economics," Handbook of Defense Economics, Elsevier, edition 1, volume 1, number 1, 00.
    This item is provided by Elsevier in its series Handbook of Defense Economics with number 1-06.

    Handle: RePEc:eee:hdechp:1-06

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    Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/bookseriesdescription.cws_home/BS_HE/description

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    Cited by:
    1. Liutang Gong & Heng-fu Zou, 2001. "Military spending and stochastic growth," CEMA Working Papers 57, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    2. Dietrich Fischer & Jurgen Brauer, 2003. "Twenty questions for peace economics: A research agenda," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 223-236.
    3. Enrico Spolaore, 2004. "Economic Integration, International Conflict and Political Unions," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(5), pages 3-50, September.
    4. William D. Nordhaus & John R. Oneal & Bruce Russett, 2009. "The Effects of the Security Environment on Military Expenditures: Pooled Analyses of 165 Countries, 1950-2000," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1707, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, revised Oct 2009.
    5. Richard Barrett & Somnath Sen, 2009. "Rational Defence: War and Peace in South Asia," Discussion Papers 09-11, Department of Economics, University of Birmingham.
    6. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 2002. "Military expenditure - threats, aid, and arms races," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2927, The World Bank.

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