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Constructions of Neoliberal Reason

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  • Peck, Jamie

    (Canada Research Chair in Urban and Regional Political Economy and Professor of Geography, University of British Columbia)

Abstract

Amongst intellectuals and activists, neoliberalism has become a potent signifier for the kind of free-market thinking that has dominated politics for the past three decades. Forever associated with the conviction politics of Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher, the free-market project has since become synonymous with the 'Washington consensus' on international development policy and the phenomenon of corporate globalization, where it has come to mean privatization, deregulation, and the opening up of new markets. But beyond its utility as a protest slogan or buzzword as shorthand for the political-economic Zeitgeist, what do we know about where neoliberalism came from and how it spread? Who are the neoliberals, and why do they studiously avoid the label? Constructions of Neoliberal Reason presents a radical critique of the free-market project, from its origins in the first half of the 20th Century through to the recent global economic crisis, from the utopian dreams of Friedrich von Hayek through the dogmatic theories of the Chicago School to the hope and hubris of Obamanomics. The book traces how neoliberalism went from crank science to common sense in the period between the Great Depression and the age of Obama. Constructions of Neoliberal Reason dramatizes the rise of neoliberalism and its uneven spread as an intellectual, political, and cultural project, combining genealogical analysis with situated case studies of formative moments throughout the world, like New York City's bankruptcy, Hurricane Katrina, and the Wall Street crisis of 2008. The book names and tracks some of neoliberalism's key protagonists, as well as some of the less visible bit-part players. It explores how this adaptive regime of market rule was produced and reproduced, its logics and limits, its faults and its fate.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Oxford University Press in its series OUP Catalogue with number 9780199662081 and published in 2012.

ISBN: 9780199662081
Order: http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199662081.do
Handle: RePEc:oxp:obooks:9780199662081

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Cited by:
  1. Danny MacKinnon & Kate Driscoll Derickson, 2012. "From Resilience to Resourcefulness: A Critique of Resilience Policy and Activism," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1212, Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography, revised Jun 2012.
  2. Yahya Madra & Fikret Adaman, 2013. "Neoliberal reason and its forms:Depoliticization through economization," Working Papers 2013/07, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
  3. Alison Alkon & Teresa Mares, 2012. "Food sovereignty in US food movements: radical visions and neoliberal constraints," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 347-359, September.
  4. Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman, 2006. "From “old school” to “farm-to-school”: Neoliberalization from the ground up," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 401-415, December.
  5. Samantha Watson, 2012. "Formalizing the Informal Economy: Women’s Autonomous Self-Employment in Rural South India," Working Papers id:4784, eSocialSciences.
  6. Fikret Adaman & Yahya M. Madra, 2012. "Understanding Neoliberalism as Economization: The Case of the Ecology," Working Papers 2012/04, Bogazici University, Department of Economics.
  7. Ngai-Ling Sum & Bob Jessop, 2013. "Competitiveness, the Knowledge-Based Economy and Higher Education," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 24-44, March.
  8. Mark Whitehead, 2013. "Degrowth or regrowth?," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 22(2), pages 141-145, April.
  9. Diana Mitlin, 2006. "Reclaiming development? NGOs and the challenge of alternatives," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-043, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  10. Sue Konzelmann & Marc Fovargue-Davies & Gerhard Schnyder, 2012. "The faces of liberal capitalism: Anglo-Saxon banking systems in crisis?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 36(2), pages 495-524.

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