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Accelerating the Globalization of America: The Role for Information Technology

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  • Catherine L. Mann

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

  • Jacob Funk Kirkegaard

    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

Information technology (IT) was key to the superior overall macroeconomic performance of the United States in the 1990s--high productivity, high growth, low inflation, and low unemployment. But IT also played a role in increasing earnings dispersion in the labor market--greatly rewarding workers with high education and skills. This US performance did not happen in a global vacuum. Globalization of US IT firms promoted deeper integration of IT throughout the US economy, which in turn promoted more extensive globalization in other sectors of the US economy and labor market. How will the increasingly globalized IT industry affect US long-term growth, intermediate macro performance, and disparities in the US labor market? What policies are needed to ensure that the United States remains first in innovation, business transformation, and education and skills, which are prerequisites for US economic leadership in the 21st century? This book traces the globalization of the IT industry, its diffusion into the US economy, and the prospects and implications of more extensive technology-enabled globalization of products and services.

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Bibliographic Info

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This book is provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Peterson Institute Press: All Books with number 3900 and published in 2006.

ISBN: 978-0-88132-390-0
Handle: RePEc:iie:ppress:3900

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Cited by:
  1. Catherine Mann, 2011. "Information Technology, Globalization, and Growth: Role for Scale Economies, Terms of Trade, and Variety," Working Papers 27, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
  2. Wilhelm Kohler, 2008. "Offshoring: Why Do Stories Differ?," CESifo Working Paper Series 2232, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Jacob Funk Kirkegaard, 2007. "Offshoring, Outsourcing, and Production Relocation—Labor-Market Effects in the OECD Countries and Developing Asia," Working Paper Series WP07-2, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  4. Mishra, Saurabh & Lundstrom, Susanna & Anand, Rahul, 2011. "Service export sophistication and economic growth," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5606, The World Bank.
  5. Sturgeon, Timothy J. & Kawakami, Momoko, 2010. "Global value chains in the electronics industry : was the crisis a window of opportunity for developing countries ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5417, The World Bank.
  6. Jacob Funk Kirkegaard, 2005. "Outsourcing and Skill Imports: Foreign High-Skilled Workers on H-1B and L-1 Visas in the United States," Working Paper Series WP05-15, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  7. Brown, Clair & Sturgeon, Timothy & Cole, Connor, 2013. "The 2010 National Organizations Survey: Examining the Relationships Between Job Quality and the Domestic and International Sourcing of Business Functions by United States Organizations," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt1sp77818, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.

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